Technology | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2017

DeepRadiology Introduces CT Head AI Analysis With Performance Exceeding Radiologists

System can detect clinically significant pathologies in CT scans with error rates better than currently published

December 7, 2017  — Deep learning artificial intelligence (AI) medical company DeepRadiology  announced the world's first computed tomography (CT) head system with performance exceeding radiologists, according to the company. The system is able to detect clinically significant pathologies in CT scans of the head with error rates better than published error rates for radiologists.

The software system was created using the latest AI techniques, the knowledge contained in all major radiology textbooks on the subject, and the cumulative experience of reviewing over 9 million CT scan images. The system is described in a paper published at the Cornell University Library website.

DeepRadiology has developed similar systems for other CT scan types as well as images produced using plain X-rays, magnetic resonance (MR), ultrasound, mammography and nuclear medicine.

The company was an exhibitor at the 2017 annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), Nov. 26-Dec. 1 in Chicago.

For more information: www.deepradiology.com

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