News | May 26, 2009

CTA is Cost-Saving, Diagnostically Beneficial, Says U. Penn. Study

May 26, 2009 – The Medical Imaging and Technology Alliance said today a recent study conducted by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania confirms computed tomography angiography (CTA) to be a safe, effective and cost-efficient means of ruling out cardiovascular disease in patients presenting to the emergency room with chest pain.  The results of this landmark study were presented at the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine’s annual conference.
 
“With over 8 million Americans coming to the emergency room with chest pain every year, it is extremely important that hospitals and patients have access to quick, efficient and high quality cardiovascular screening procedures such as CTA,” said Ilyse Schuman, managing director, MITA, a member of the Access to Medical Imaging Coalition. “MITA applauds the work of Dr. Hollander and his team, whose groundbreaking study provides definitive proof that CTA is a highly effective means of ruling out cardiovascular disease. This not only reassures patients, but also helps to avoid unnecessary procedures, particularly trips to the cath lab, and reduces risk of contracting community acquired infections.”
 
In this, the first long-term study following a large number of patients who have undergone emergency room CTA, Judd Hollander, M.D., and his team tracked 481 patients for one year after receiving a negative scan (i.e., a scan that showed no serious coronary blockages or damage to the heart). While 11 percent of the patients required rehospitalization at some point over the year, and another 11 percent received additional cardiac testing, not a single patient suffered a heart attack or required revascularization procedures to open blocked arteries. 
 
CTA has been already proven cost-effective in countless studies, with previous University of Pennsylvania research showing CTA to save $2,500 per patient in a hospital setting. This most recent study by Hollander, et al, now proves CTA not only to be cost-saving, but diagnostically beneficial as well.
 
Yet, despite rapidly compounding evidence that CTA is both cost-saving and diagnostically effective, Medicare does not currently cover the procedure in an emergency room setting.  In discussing the potential for a national coverage decision on CTA, Hollander states, “The evidence now clearly shows that when used in appropriate patients in the ED [emergency department], we can safely and rapidly reduce hospital admission and save money…It seems time to make a national coverage decision that will facilitate coronary CTA in the emergency department."
 
MITA is a division of the National Electrical Manufacturers Association. 

For more information: www.medicalimaging.org

Related Content

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carrie Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Henry Ford Hospital's ViewRay MRIdian linear accelerator system allows real-time MRI-guided radiotherapy. Shown is the support staff for this system. In the center of the photo is Benjamin Movsas, M.D., chair of radiation oncology at Henry Ford Cancer Institute. Second from the right is Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D., director of translational research, radiation oncology.

Feature | Henry Ford Hospital | May 21, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Henry Ford Hospital thought leaders regularly speak at the radiation oncology and radiology conferences about new res
MaxQ AI Launches Accipio Ax Slice-Level Intracranial Hemorrhage Detection
Technology | Computer-Aided Detection Software | May 21, 2019
Medical diagnostic artificial intelligence (AI) company MaxQ AI announced that Accipio Ax will begin shipping in August...
AI Detects Unsuspected Lung Cancer in Radiology Reports, Augments Clinical Follow-up
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 20, 2019
Digital Reasoning announced results from its automated radiology report analytics research. In a series of experiments...
Baylor Scott White Heart Hospital Siemens Flash CT system used for dedicated cardiac CT scans, CCTA, CTA.
360 Photos | CT Angiography (CTA) | May 20, 2019
This is a 360 degree photo of a Siemens Somatom Force 64-slice, dual-source computed tomography (CT) system installed
New Study Evaluates Head CT Examinations and Patient Complexity
News | Neuro Imaging | May 17, 2019
Computed tomography (CT) of the head uses special X-ray equipment to help assess head injuries, dizziness and other...
FDA Clears Aidoc's AI Solution for Flagging Pulmonary Embolism
Technology | Artificial Intelligence | May 15, 2019
Artificial intelligence (AI) solutions provider Aidoc has been granted U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...
Gorilla Undergoes Follow-up CT Scan at Boston's Franklin Park Zoo

Gigi, a western lowland gorilla at Fanklin Park Zoo (Boston), recently underwent a computed tomography (CT) scan as part of efforts to identify the cause of ongoing health issues in recent months. Image courtesy of Zoo New England

News | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 06, 2019
Gigi, a western lowland gorilla, was recently put under anesthesia at Franklin Park Zoo (Boston) so the zoo’s...
Aidoc Raises $27 Million in Series B Funding
News | Artificial Intelligence | May 02, 2019
Radiology artificial intelligence (AI) solutions provider Aidoc announced a $27 million investment, bringing its total...
Canon Medical Installs First CT Scanner With AI in Belgium
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | May 02, 2019
May 2, 2019 — Canon Medical has installed the Aquilion One Genesis, one of the first...