News | June 10, 2010

CT Performed to Diagnose Black Bear's Injury

A CT exam shows the bear broke a piece of bone the size of an almond inside her elbow and that piece is moving around the joint.

Yona was sedated for about 2.5 hours, she had a CT scan, radiographs, blood work and dermatology exam.

June 11, 2010 - Yona, the Museum of Life and Science’s yearling black bear, received a computed tomography (CT) scan June 8 to determine what’s causing her angular limb deformity. A team of 20 assisted with the procedure, including North Carolina State Veterinary Teaching Hospital staff, an orthopedic surgeon, professor of veterinary orthopedics Denis Marcellin-Little and Michael Stoskopf, DVM.

Results showed bone chips in Yona's right elbow. While at the vet school, she was sedated for about 2.5 hours, during which she had a CT scan, radiographs, blood work, dermatology exam – including skin scrape and punch biopsy - physical exam, manipulation of her limbs and more.

“Yona injured her arm a long time ago. Fortunately, her arm is still growing. Her elbow is a little bit out of alignment, but that does not appear to be getting worse. She broke a piece of bone the size of an almond inside her elbow and that piece is moving around the joint. We may remove it in the future," Marcellin-Little said.

Yona was found abandoned on the roadside in Townsend, Tenn., in February of 2009. It is possible she may have sustained the injury at this time.

Currently, Yona is doing just fine. She’s on exhibit and continues to wrestle with Gus, the 4-year-old black bear, swim in the bear pool, climb the mulberry tree and relax near the waterfall.

For more information: www.lifeandscience.org

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