Technology | March 02, 2015

CompView Medical Introduces First Mobile Visualization Boom System

NuCart provides HD images with greater flexibility for hybrid ORs

CompView Medical, NuCart, mounts, flat panel displays, hybrid OR, mobile boom

March 2, 1015 — CompView Medical (CVM) introduced an all-in-one equipment manager, visualization and ergonomic boom system — the NuCart. The NuCart is the mobile version of the popular NuBoom system, extending advantages of turn-key video integration that can be wheeled to the point of care. NuCart provides high-definition (HD) images to surgeons during minimally invasive surgery where mobile fluoroscopy, ultrasound and surgical video are used. The cart also provides an equipment organization system that removes trip hazards and clutter to improve staff and patient safety. The NuCart is suited for modular image-guided hybrid operating rooms (ORs) for procedures such as urology, interventional and general surgery.

NuCart is designed to exceed the ergonomic adjustability required by surgeons when utilizing mobile C-arms. The system provides more flexibility than traditional construction approaches because it is mobile, not built-in. The cost saving approach of a mobile boom system accommodates more flexible surgery scheduling because each OR can be easily reconfigured.

Nationwide there are about 5,000 licensed hospitals that provide in-patient surgery. Additionally, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) and office-based surgery centers now account for almost twice the number of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) outpatient locations, with approximately 6,100 and 3,600 sites respectively. The ASC and office-based surgery centers market is essentially untapped and mobile visualization and boom carts can provide this segment with the level of AV integration and surgeon ergonomics they are accustomed to finding in large hospitals.

“Over the last five years, the number of integrated operating rooms in the U.S. has grown rapidly. There are over 63,000 available operating rooms in the U.S, of which only 23 percent were integrated at the end of 2013,” said Karlo Kordic, endoscopy account manager, iData Research Inc. “That percentage is expected to increase to 33 percent by 2020. OR integration often comes bundled with surgical booms. As a larger portion of ORs become integrated, this is expected to drive growth for the surgical boom market.”

The NuCart can be installed in a few hours, helping customers avoid costly OR downtime due to construction. Since it is mobile, instead of being suspended from the OR ceiling, expensive remodeling to reinforce the ceiling is avoided. Additionally, it is easily removed from a leasehold should the customer relocate.

For more information: www.nuboom.com

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