News | Information Technology | March 14, 2016

CMS, ONC Announce New Medicaid Connectivity Initiative

Program focusing on interoperability of health data will include providers in long-term care, behavioral health, substance abuse treatment and more

CMS, ONC HIT, Medicaid, IT connectivity initiative, HIMSS 2016

March 14, 2016 — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC HIT) announced a new initiative to improve interoperability between Medicaid providers. The initiative, announced by CMS Acting Administrator Andy Slavitt and ONC Karen DeSalvo, is designed to improve patient care by distributing information and best practices to provide a better experience of care for individuals in the health system. 

The program will include long-term care, behavioral health providers, substance abuse treatment centers and other providers that have been slower to adopt technology. This announcement will help to bridge an information sharing gap in Medicaid by permitting states to request the 90 percent enhanced matching funds from CMS to connect a broader variety of Medicaid providers to a health information exchange than those providers who are eligible for such connections today. This additional funding will enhance the sustainability of health information exchanges and lead to increased connectivity among Medicaid providers.   

Doctors and other clinicians need access to the right information at the right time in a manner they can use to make decisions that impact their patient’s health. The free flow of information is hampered when not all doctors, facilities or other practice areas are able to make a complete circuit. Adding long-term care providers, behavioral health providers and substance abuse treatment providers, for example, to statewide health information exchange systems will enable seamless sharing of a patients’ health information between doctors or other clinicians when it’s needed. This sharing helps create a more complete care team to collaborate on the best treatment plans and goals for Medicaid patients.

The benefits are tangible – from care coordination to medication reconciliation to public health reporting. Exchanging care information can support patients with multiple chronic conditions as they navigate specialists, hospitals, primary care, home healthcare and pharmacies. Medication reconciliation for children in the foster care system avoids duplicative or missed treatments. And, public health reporting sounds the warning bell on potential public health disasters and improves the use of preventive measures, such as immunizations. This investment should also speed the adoption of alternative payment models that focus on the quality rather than the quantity of care provided. As the Medicaid program moves towards paying for quality, technology infrastructure and information exchange is needed for better care coordination.

For more information: www.cms.gov, www.healthit.gov

Related Content

Acuson Sequoia
News | Ultrasound Imaging | September 12, 2018
Siemens Healthineers announced the first global installation of its newest ultrasound system, the...
Feature | Radiology Business | September 07, 2018 | By Marilyn M. Singleton, M.D., J.D.
“Disruptive innovation” is all the buzz. Repealing the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is so last year. Well, disrupt this:...
Sponsored Content | Case Study | Information Technology | September 07, 2018
Established in 1970, Sovah Health – Martinsville, Va., resides in the foothills of the beautiful Blue Ridge Mountains...
Feature | Population Health | September 07, 2018 | By Jeff Zagoudis
Over the last several years in the U.S., healthcare providers have been trying to shift their focus to more preventive...
Sponsored Content | Case Study | Information Technology | September 07, 2018
One of the Northeast’s major teaching hospitals is an international leader in virtually every area of medicine. It has...
The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.

The CT scanner might not come with protocols that are adequate for each hospital situation, so at Phoenix Children’s Hospital they designed their own protocols, said Dianna Bardo, M.D., director of body MR and co-director of the 3D Innovation Lab at Phoenix Children’s.

Sponsored Content | Case Study | Radiation Dose Management | September 07, 2018
Radiation dose management is central to child patient safety. Medical imaging plays an increasing role in the accurate...
Novarad No. 1 in Customer Satisfaction on Gartner Peer Insights VNA Category
News | Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) | September 04, 2018
Novarad Healthcare Enterprise Imaging has taken the highest rated spot on Gartner’s Peer Insights technology review...
LifeImage LITE Application Expands Image Sharing Network to 1,500 Connected Hospitals
News | Enterprise Imaging | September 04, 2018
September 4, 2018 — LifeImage announced that its recently launched application, LITE, has helped to dramatically incr
Greenville Health System Adopts Agfa HealthCare Enterprise Imaging System
News | Enterprise Imaging | August 31, 2018
Agfa HealthCare and Greenville Health System (GHS), South Carolina, announced the successful implementation of a...
Australian Pediatric Healthcare Network Adopts ResolutionMD Viewer
News | Remote Viewing Systems | August 31, 2018
August 30, 2018 — New South Wales, Australia’s Newborn and...
Overlay Init