News | Ultrasound Imaging | March 28, 2016

Civco Medical Solutions Acquires PCI Medical

Civco expands product offering to include family of devices for storage, high-level disinfection and reprocessing of ultrasound transducers

March 28, 2016 — Civco Medical Solutions announced that it has acquired PCI Medical, a market leader in high-level disinfection products for ultrasound transducers. The acquisition equips Civco with a portfolio of hardware and consumables for cost-effective infection control compliance in the ultrasound transducer reprocessing market. 

The PCI product line complements the Civco offering of ultrasound infection control transducer covers, needle guidance systems and interventional procedure kits. 

The addition of the new Astra family of devices, which received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(K) clearance in November 2015, extends Civco’s reach into cardiology and men’s and women’s health segments. The Astra TEE, designed for automatic high-level disinfection of transesophageal echo ultrasound probes, and the Astra VR, designed for automated high-level disinfection of transvaginal and transrectal probes, enable clinicians to develop a standardized workflow, save time and automate the recordkeeping process. These devices help facilities follow guidelines established by the Joint Commission and FDA for transducer reprocessing and storage.

For more information: www.civco.com, www.pcimedical.com

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