Technology | Quality Assurance (QA) | August 15, 2016

CIRS Releases Large Field MRI Distortion Phantom

Large Field MRI Distortion Phantom, Model 604, MRI QA, MRI Phantom, CIRS

August 15, 2016 — The Large Field MRI Distortion Phantom, Model 604, from CIRS is designed for assessment of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) distortion caused mainly by the nonlinearity of the magnetic gradients. It can also help quantify MRI image distortion due to chemical shifts and susceptibility due to density differences common in diagnostic and radiation therapy treatment planning. 

The phantom’s 3-D grid of large size and equal spacing in all three orthogonal dimensions makes it suitable for distortion quality assurance (QA) of large bore MRI and computed tomography (CT) scanning for distortion-free imaging. The phantom can be filled with various signal-generating solutions for use in MRI. Contrast of the grid-liquid interface varies under CT depending on the liquid used for generating MRI background signal. When empty, the grid-air interface provides good contrast under CT. The phantom images well with all CT techniques and MRI sequences tested to date, including T1 weighted, T2 weighted, 3D Time of Flight, MPRAGE and CISS sequences.

The phantom is comprised of a leak-proof PMMA cylinder and measures 330 mm in diameter by 300 mm long. The entire volume is filled with a unique orthogonal 3-D grid of 3 mm diameter rods spaced 20 mm apart to provide complete geometric data throughout the imaging volume.  The phantom is marked for ease of alignment to positioning lasers and is designed for use with both curved and flat gantry tables.

For more information: www.cirsinc.com

Related Content

Detroit-based magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technology company SpinTech, Inc. has acquired medical-imaging research and technology developer Magnetic Resonance Innovations, Inc. (MR Innovations).
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 24, 2021
February 24, 2021 — Detroit-based magnetic resonance...
Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

Axial FLAIR MR image shows T2 prolongation in bilateral middle cerebellar peduncles (arrows). Findings were associated with restricted diffusion and areas of T1 hypointense signal without enhancement or abnormal susceptibility. Image courtesy of American Roentgen Ray Society (ARRS), American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR)

News | Coronavirus (COVID-19) | February 22, 2021
February 22, 2021 — According to an...
T1 structural images for the two sequences, MPRAGE and MPRAGE+PMC. The top row shows the MPRAGE sequence, while the bottom row shows the images that were generated with the MPRAGE+PMC sequence. Columns represent two different participants, one with minimal head motion (left, Low-Mover) and another with a large quantity of motion (right, High-Mover). Pial and white matter (WM) surface reconstruction from Freesurfer are also shown.

T1 structural images for the two sequences, MPRAGE and MPRAGE+PMC. The top row shows the MPRAGE sequence, while the bottom row shows the images that were generated with the MPRAGE+PMC sequence. Columns represent two different participants, one with minimal head motion (left, Low-Mover) and another with a large quantity of motion (right, High-Mover). Pial and white matter (WM) surface reconstruction from Freesurfer are also shown.

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 17, 2021
February 17, 2021 — A new paper,...
Insightec plans to expand in Latin America through a partnership with Strattner
News | Focused Ultrasound Therapy | February 16, 2021
February 16, 2021 — Insightec, a global healthcare company focused on creating the next generation of patient care, a
Unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body's ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause "oxidative stress".

Unhealthy lifestyles, various diseases, stress, and aging can all contribute to an imbalance between the production of ROS and the body's ability to reduce and eliminate them. The resulting excessive levels of ROS cause "oxidative stress". Graphic courtesy of National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 10, 2021
February 10, 2021 — Oxygen is essential for human life, but within the body, certain biological environmental conditi
Phase III clinical trial of men with a clinical suspicion of prostate cancer finds MRI with targeted biopsies to be more accurate at diagnosis and less intrusive than current standard
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 08, 2021
February 8, 2021 — The results of a Phase III randomized clinical trial have shown that when it comes to detecting cl

Beckman researcher, Brad Sutton (Photo courtesy the Beckman Institute)

News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | February 01, 2021
February 1, 2021 — Researchers at the Beckman Institute for Ad...