News | May 19, 2015

Children’s Hospital Los Angeles Shares Patient Imaging Records through Novel App

Free, portable and privacy-protected technology gives patient families full access to imaging data and diagnostic reports

ImageInbox, CHLA, smartphones, imaging files, Lee Daly, Alexandra

May 19, 2015 — Parents of patients treated at Children’s Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) can now download a free app called ImageInbox on their smartphones to receive imaging files or to request the files be sent directly to another caregiver. CHLA is the first clinical site to offer the app, which is now available for free to any patient.

Physicians use a growing array of diagnostic imaging equipment, such magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT), ultrasound and X-rays. Due to the massive size of the digital files, remote sharing of these medical images with patients or other clinicians has been very difficult. Patients have had to ask their radiologist to transfer medical images to a CD, then pick up these medical records in person and deliver them to a referring physician, when necessary – a very time-consuming and cumbersome process.

With ImageInbox, the large data files (for example, a typical MR image is about 500 MB in size) are encrypted and stored securely on a patient’s personal cloud-based system, which can also be accessed at no charge.

“The system is fully protected and private,” said Stephan G. Erberich, Ph.D., director of biomedical information at The Saban Research Institute of CHLA. Erberich and Marvin D. Nelson, M.D., chair of the Department of Radiology at CHLA – both also professors at Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California – are co-founders of NexGenic, the company that developed ImageInbox. They created this first-of-its-kind app to improve the patient experience and provide assurance to both doctors and patients that healthcare information is available at the point of care.

“It allows parents to own – and have immediate access to – their child’s imaging medical records,” said Erberich.

Lee Daly’s daughter, Alexandra, was treated at CHLA for several years, where brain surgeons performed three craniotomies. The family later moved to Oregon where, at age 19, Alexandra exhibited mysterious symptoms that worried her family and new doctors.

Daly said she found it nearly impossible to obtain her daughter’s early brain scans to share with the neurosurgeons at Oregon Health and Science University Medical Center (OHSU), so they could compare the large mass they were now seeing on Alexandra’s tonsil with images of the brain-stem bleed she had experienced as a child. Facing exploratory surgery for her daughter, since OHSU were unable to compare their images to earlier ones, Daly reached out to Nelson and his team for help to quickly obtain Alexandra’s previous CT scans and MRIs from CHLA.

“We were one of the first families to use ImageInbox in an emergency situation, and it was an absolute life saver,” she said. Alexandra’s imaging records from CHLA showed doctors in Oregon that the mass they were seeing on their scans was actually an abscess that had been there for many years, and not a tumor.

“If we hadn’t been able to get these images quickly, my daughter would have faced unnecessary, invasive and potentially dangerous surgery,” Daly said.

She and Alexandra now have the imaging records stored on their personal cloud storage and accessible on their smartphones; the information is at their fingertips should they ever need it. “I’m all for this and think we should all be the holders of our own medical records,” Lee said, adding that as people move, or even need medical assistance while traveling, “you just never know when an emergency will occur.”

The app makes care more affordable—for patients, who can avoid having duplicate scans done when they switch healthcare providers; and for hospitals, that can readily exchange medical images electronically, directly with the patient, instead of using older, more expensive technologies like CDs to store and share the data.

“This also means the children can avoid unnecessary radiation exposure that can occur with repeating tests,” said Nelson. “Importantly, their families will have these records, even multi-dimensional images like MRIs or 3-D CT, if and when they need them, anywhere in the world with internet access.”

For more information: www.chla.org

Related Content

Smartphone Addiction Creates Imbalance in Brain
News | Mobile Devices | January 11, 2018
Researchers have found an imbalance in the brain chemistry of young people addicted to smartphones and the internet,...
About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

Feature | Breast Imaging | January 02, 2018 | Kathryn Pearson Peyton, M.D.
Sixty million women undergo regular screening mammography in the United States, but even in the digital age, it is di
Philips Expands Population Health Management Business With Acquisition of VitalHealth
News | Population Health | December 28, 2017
Philips recently announced that it acquired VitalHealth, a provider of cloud-based population health management...
Videos | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | December 13, 2017
Emanuel Kanal, M.D., director of MRI services and professor of radiology and neuroradiology at the University of Pitt
AI Visualize Inc. Debuts Artificial Intelligence Cloud Image Visualization Platform at RSNA 2017
Technology | Remote Viewing Systems | December 13, 2017
AI Visualize Inc. debuted its new cloud-based artificial intelligence (A.I.) -based image analysis and viewing platform...
Ikonopedia and Konica Minolta Showcase Integrated Breast Imaging Workflow and Reporting at RSNA
News | Breast Imaging | December 05, 2017
Ikonopedia and Konica Minolta Healthcare Americas Inc. showcased integrated breast imaging workflow and reporting at...
Ambra Health Joins Google Cloud Technology Partner Program
News | PACS Accessories | December 05, 2017
December 4, 2017 — Ambra Health recently announced a new relationship with Google Cloud.
Vital Unveils Newest Vitrea Advanced Visualization Release at RSNA 2017
Technology | Advanced Visualization | December 04, 2017
Vital Images unveiled the newest version of Vitrea Advanced Visualization software, the cornerstone of its imaging...
Paxeramed Demonstrates Patient-Centric Image Sharing Platform at RSNA 2017
News | Mobile Devices | November 22, 2017
November 22, 2017 — Paxeramed will showcase its...
Ambra Health Rolls Out New Features for Medical Image Exchange Platform
News | Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) | November 20, 2017
Ambra Health announced that Atrius Health and Envision Radiology are among the latest leading providers to adopt Ambra...
Overlay Init