News | Radiology Imaging | August 10, 2016

Carestream Surpasses One Billion Square Meters of Dryview Film

Company specializes in precision coating assets for advanced materials applications

August 10, 2016 — Carestream Health announced that it has produced more than 1 billion square meters of its DryView Laser Imaging Film and other specialty films at its White City, Ore., facility — enough film to circle the Earth 70 times.

Carestream Dryview film for medical imaging use is sold in more than 140 countries. It contains more than 25 different components, including nanoparticles, with four layers coated simultaneously on the top of a positron emission tomography (PET) film base and two layers on the back. The six-layer Dryview film is coated in one pass at a rate of hundreds of feet per minute with in-line quality inspection to meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-regulated Class 1 medical device requirements.

The company’s manufacturing capabilities include its Contract Manufacturing operations that apply specialized manufacturing processes using high-technology coating assets to help contract-coating customers and partners develop better products at a competitive cost using coated or cast film-based advanced materials.

Carestream Contract Manufacturing offers optimal product design, technology integration, manufacturing support, distribution and finishing (slitting and packaging) capabilities with facilities in Asia and North America. The company can create structures of up to 20 precision-coated layers in a single pass, with options for two-sided coating, radiation cure, on-line inspection and lamination.

Carestream adheres to top global standards for quality and certification including ISO 9001, ISO 13485 and ISO 14001.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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