News | Information Technology | October 31, 2018

Carestream Spotlights Healthcare IT and Imaging Systems at RSNA 2018

Enterprise imaging, orthopedic imaging and digital X-ray highlight product offerings on display

Carestream Spotlights Healthcare IT and Imaging Systems at RSNA 2018

October 31, 2018 — Carestream announced it will be displaying several imaging and healthcare information technology (IT) offerings at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Nov. 25-30 in Chicago.

Technologies on display will include:

  • Carestream’s Vue Clinical Collaboration Platform is an enterprise imaging solution that allows providers to consolidate, manage, and seamlessly share images and data across the enterprise. It is a modular, multi-site, multi-domain, standards-based solution that is designed to make patient images and data easily accessible to all stakeholders in the continuum of care, from referring physicians to specialists, IT professionals, business administrators and patients. It provides the backbone for a fully integrated clinical imaging, workflow and reporting infrastructure. The Clinical Collaboration Platform accommodates all major clinical data formats and communication protocols to simplify deployment of applications and sharing of resources.
  • Carestream’s OnSight 3D Extremity System uses cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) technology to capture high-quality, low-dose images of upper and lower extremities, including weight-bearing exams.
  • The DRX-Evolution Plus System offers superb image quality and special features that can enhance capture of pediatric, orthopedic and trauma exams. Optional EVP Plus Software provides increased latitude and high-contrast image detail.
  • Carestream’s DRX Plus detectors are thinner and lighter than other detectors and deliver enhanced image quality, while DRX Core detectors make digital radiography (DR) imaging more affordable.
  • Carestream also will demonstrate its MyVue Center Self-Service Kiosk that automates storing, printing, and sharing of patients’ medical images and radiology reports.

 

For more information: www.carestream.com

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