News | Digital Radiography (DR) | January 14, 2021

Carestream Focused on Innovation in Diagnostic Imaging Portfolio at Virtual RSNA

Carestream Health showcased its expertise in medical imaging across an array of clinical specialties at the virtual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). From bedside imaging solutions to scalable X-ray room systems, the company demonstrated its growing product portfolio that fits budget, workflow, safety and space requirements.

January 14, 2021 — Carestream Health showcased its expertise in medical imaging across an array of clinical specialties at the virtual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). From bedside imaging solutions to scalable X-ray room systems, the company demonstrated its growing product portfolio that fits budget, workflow, safety and space requirements.

“The range of our offerings is expanding because we listen to our customers, develop products that meet their wide-ranging needs and help them improve the quality of care they provide to their patients,” said David C. Westgate, Chairman, President and CEO of Carestream. “Our teams are committed to continuously researching new opportunities to use cutting-edge technologies to improve how our systems perform and enhance the results they deliver.”

Featured Carestream products at RSNA included:

  • Advanced bedside and digital radiography (DR) room imaging: The DRX-Revolution Mobile X-ray System provides critical bedside imaging and delivers high-quality medical images in tight spaces. Additional features to reduce contamination include flush-mounted displays that provide a smooth surface for easier disinfecting. With flexibility and scalability in mind, Carestream’s new DRX-Compass X-ray System offers access to a wide selection of configurable components, tailored to each environment. The system allows mid-tier facilities to expand the types of medical imaging exams they provide, improving patient care and boosting productivity.
  • Setting standards in detectors and image processing: Carestream provides X-ray detectors that deliver accurate, high-quality diagnostic image capture. The new DRX-L Detector—which captures long-length, high-resolution images for leg length and spine exams with a single exposure—speeds clinician workflow and minimizes patient discomfort. The Focus 35C and 43C detectors are fast, light and an ideal, budget-friendly way for smaller facilities and private practices to upgrade to DR imaging. Carestream’s Eclipse is the engine behind the company’s innovative imaging software. It uses artificial intelligence (AI) technology to significantly increase the value of the entire imaging chain, from capture to diagnosis. Eclipse powers features for imaging intelligence, workflow efficiency and healthcare analytics.
  • Making pediatric imaging safer and easier: The DRX-Revolution Nano Mobile X-ray System enables Neonatal Intensive Care Units (NICU) to noninvasively and effectively examine and treat children, and conduct chest, intensive care and orthopaedic exams quickly at the patient’s bedside. Portable and nonmotorized, the DRX-Revolution Nano features an ultra-lightweight design for easy maneuverability and arm positioning; and
  • Access to company experts: Through a virtual talk show series, Carestream Talks, company experts offer insights on technology, new products and research in medical imaging. These webinars will feature conversations on how innovative Carestream technologies help solve key challenges across diverse diagnostic imaging environments.

With more new products expected next year, Carestream is in a strong position to provide customers and business partners with compelling new medical imaging products and support to benefit both patients and providers.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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