News | December 02, 2013

Cardiac MRI Reveals Energy Drinks Alter Heart Function

To visualize cardiac magnetic resonance tagging, cross-section of the heart in common imaging technique is seen on the left and tagged myocardium using CSPAMM on the right.

December 2, 2013 — Healthy adults who consumed energy drinks high in caffeine and taurine had significantly increased heart contraction rates one hour later, according to a study presented at the the Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting (RSNA 2013).
 
"Until now, we haven't known exactly what effect these energy drinks have on the function of the heart," said Jonas Dörner, M.D. and radiology resident of the cardiovascular imaging section, University of Bonn, Germany. "There are concerns about the products' potential adverse side effects on heart function, especially in adolescents and young adults, but there is little or no regulation of energy drink sales."
 
Energy drinks represent a multibillion-dollar industry that is growing every day. While teenagers and young adults have traditionally been the largest consumers, in recent years more people of all demographics have begun consuming energy drinks.
 
A 2013 report from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) stated that in the United States from 2007 to 2011, the number of emergency department visits related to energy drink consumption nearly doubled, increasing from 10,068 to 20,783. Most of the cases were identified among patients 18 to 25 years old, followed by those 26 to 39 years old.
 
"Usually energy drinks contain taurine and caffeine as their main pharmacological ingredients," said Dörner. "The amount of caffeine is up to three times higher than in other caffeinated beverages like coffee or cola. There are many side effects known to be associated with a high intake of caffeine, including rapid heart rate, palpitations, rise in blood pressure and, in the most severe cases, seizures or sudden death."
 
For the study, which is ongoing, Dörner and colleagues used cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to measure the effect of energy drink consumption on heart function in 18 healthy volunteers, including 15 men and three women with a mean age of 27.5 years. Each of the volunteers underwent cardiac MRI before and one hour after consuming an energy drink containing taurine (400 mg/100 ml) and caffeine (32 mg/100 ml).
 
Compared to the baseline images, results of cardiac MRI performed one hour after the study participants consumed the energy drink revealed significantly increased peak strain and peak systolic strain rates in the left ventricle of the heart.
 
"We don't know exactly how or if this greater contractility of the heart impacts daily activities or athletic performance," said Dörner. "We need additional studies to understand this mechanism and to determine how long the effect of the energy drink lasts."
 
The researchers found no significant differences in heart rate, blood pressure or the amount of blood ejected from the left ventricle of the heart between the volunteers' baseline and second MRI exams.
 
"We've shown that energy drink consumption has a short-term impact on cardiac contractility," said Dörner. "Further studies are needed to evaluate the impact of long-term energy drink consumption and the effect of such drinks on individuals with heart disease."
 
Dörner said that while long-term risks to the heart from drinking energy drinks remain unknown, he advises that children, as well as people with known cardiac arrhythmias, should avoid energy drinks, because changes in contractility could trigger arrhythmias. He also cautions that additional study is needed to address risks posed by the consumption of energy drinks in combination with alcohol.
 
The principal investigator of the study was Daniel Thomas, M.D. Other co-authors are Daniel Kuetting, M.D., Claas Naehle, M.D., and Hans Schild, M.D.
 
For more information: www.uni-bonn.de, www.rsna.org

Related Content

ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac Sarcoidosis
News | Cardiac Imaging | August 18, 2017
August 18, 2017 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) has released a joint expert consensus document wi
Houston Methodist Hospital Enters Multi-Year Technology and Research Agreement With Siemens Healthineers
News | Imaging | August 17, 2017
Houston Methodist Hospital and Siemens Healthineers have entered into a multi-year agreement to bring cutting-edge...
Carestream Launches MR Brain Perfusion and Diffusion Modules for Vue PACS
Technology | Advanced Visualization | August 16, 2017
Carestream Health recently introduced new MR (magnetic resonance) Brain Perfusion and MR Brain Diffusion modules that...
X-ray of a knee replacement. CMS may change reimbursements for joint and knee replacements. Patient Marilyn Fornell.

CMS may change how it reimburses for knee replacements and said it may eliminate bundled payments for acute cardiac care.

Feature | Business | August 16, 2017 | Dave Fornell
August 16, 2017 — The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced a proposed rule to reduce the number
ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Contrast Media | August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
CMS considers eliminating or changing bundled payments for orthopedic and knee replacement imaging. Photo by Vital Images

CMS is considering elimination or changing bundled payments for knee replacements. 

News | August 14, 2017 | Dave Fornell
...
CDN to Integrate Advanced Cardiac Imaging Tools From DiA Imaging Analysis
Technology | Advanced Visualization | August 10, 2017
August 10, 2017 — CDN recently announced a new partnership agreement with DiA Imaging Analysis Ltd., makers of next-g
Four Blue Cross Blue Shield Companies Issue Positive Medical Policies on HeartFlow FFRct Analysis
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | August 09, 2017
HeartFlow Inc. announced that four Blue Cross Blue Shield companies have each issued a positive medical policy for the...
MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
Overlay Init