News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 06, 2019

Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program

Upgrade program enables customers to access newest MR innovations without the costs associated with a new installation

Canon Medical Introduces Encore Orian MR Upgrade Program

August 6, 2019 — Canon Medical Systems USA Inc. is helping to provide low-cost patient care solutions for its customers with the launch of the Encore Orian MR upgrade program. The program enables users of Canon Medical’s magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems, including the Vantage and Atlas, to upgrade their system to Canon Medical’s brand new MR, the Vantage Orian 1.5T, with significantly less downtime and a lower cost than purchasing a new system.

With the Encore Orian MR upgrade, Canon Medical customers now have access to the Orian hardware and digital software platform that can help improve workflow and deliver clinical confidence. The upgrade includes an all-new detachable, dockable table option enabling preparation outside the scan room, enhancing workflow and allowing medical staff to respond to patient requirements quickly and easily. It also includes a re-designed digital gantry interface which displays important patient-related and coil information, allowing technologists to ensure a proper, complete setup without leaving the patient's side. The Orian also includes the EasyTech software package, featuring:

  • NeuroLine+ to achieve outstanding scan consistency for all brain exams;
  • SpineLine with its auto-locator functionality allows providers to plan spine studies quickly and easily and sagittal and coronal locators to set double-oblique slices, enhancing the reproducibility of follow-up exams; and
  • SUREVOI Knee to support the accurate alignment of the knee to the iso-center which reduces artifact-related re-scans, and KneeLine+ to improve reproducibility and image quality.

The all-new system enhancements come in addition to the existing patient-friendly MRI features Canon Medical offers, including:

  • The 71cm wide bore patient aperture; 
  • An optional MR Theater feature delivering an in-bore immersive virtual experience to encourage patients to relax and stay still, enabling clinicians to produce stable, high-quality imaging; and 
  • Pianissimo technology, which significantly reduces the noise in and around the MRI environment, making exams even more comfortable and easier to complete.

For more information: www.us.medical.canon

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