News | Artificial Intelligence | November 30, 2020

Canon Expands Its AI-Based Image Reconstruction Technology

Showcasing Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) technology on wider range of clinical applications, more modalities and systems

Showcasing Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) technology on wider range of clinical applications, more modalities and systems

November 30, 2020 — Canon Medical is bringing the power of accessible artificial intelligence (AI) for improved image quality to more patients. The company is expanding its Advanced intelligent Clear-IQ Engine (AiCE) Deep Learning Reconstruction (DLR) to additional modalities, clinical indications and systems making this the widest availability of DLR imaging technology.

“As we continue to expand the availability of AiCE, Canon Medical is ensuring that the maximum number of patients can benefit from the advanced images, expanded clinical capabilities and seamless integration that this advanced AI technology provides,” said Satrajit Misra, vice president, Marketing, Canon Medical Systems USA, Inc. “In today’s environment, making images easy to read and acquire is more important than ever, and this is the latest demonstration of our commitment to offering accessible AI that clinicians can use to make the greatest impact on patient care.”

AiCE was trained using vast amounts of high-quality image data, and features a deep learning neural network that can reduce noise and boost signal to quickly deliver sharp, clear and distinct images, further opening doors for advancements across multiple imaging exam types.

Introducing AI for MI

Bringing the power of artificial intelligence (AI) to molecular imaging, Canon Medical will showcase AiCE DLR for the Cartesion Prime Digital PET/CT system (pending 510(k) clearance) at this year’s RSNA annual meeting. An innovative approach to reconstruction, AiCE on the Cartesion Prime Digital PET/CT can bring the possibility of faster scan times, lower dose and improved image quality than traditionally acquired during both the PET and CT acquisitions.

DLR Now Widely Available for CT Radiology Portfolio

Canon Medical first brought AiCE DLR technology to CT in 2018, and now that technology is available across many CT scanners in its radiology portfolio. AiCE is seamlessly integrated into routine CT workflow for operational efficiency without causing any extra steps, producing sharp, clear and distinct images at low doses.

Canon Medical has once again brought advanced innovation across product lines and continues to deliver on its commitment to provide the same level of high-quality care for every patient.

AiCE Expands Indications and Applications in MR

AiCE DLR is now available for virtually all types of clinical exams on Canon Medical’s Vantage Orian 1.5T MRI system. The capacity to scan a vastly larger number of clinical indications, from prostate to shoulders, including all joints, cardiac, pelvis, abdomen and spine, in combination with accelerated scan technologies like Compressed SPEEDER, empowers clinicians using MR to boost their image quality, performance and productivity on a whole new scale.

With the expansion of indications, Canon Medical’s AiCE Challenge has also expanded. To see if you can tell the difference between 1.5T AiCE and traditional 3T image quality, take the AiCE Challenge today. 

Learn more about the expansion of AiCE DLR at this year’s virtual RSNA annual meeting at Canon Medical’s unique, immersive booth experience.

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