Case Study | September 05, 2012

In Breast Cancer Screening, the Test Matters

Believing that in breast cancer screening, the test matters, the physicians of Washington Radiology Associates invest heavily in breast tomosynthesis

Ott
 Holland
 Rose
 Lipsit
 Dunner
Carol Rubin
Klein
 Julianne Greenberg

Twenty-seven radiologists at Washington Radiology Associates (WRA), a large private imaging practice in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, perform 85,000 mammograms annually at six clinical offices. In 2011, WRA replaced all of its 2D mammography systems with 15 Hologic Selenia Dimensions systems. Between August 2011 and June 2012, WRA phased in tomosynthesis on all 15 machines and began offering the 3D exam to patients. WRA was the first practice in the region to offer breast tomosynthesis, and the purchase made WRA the largest user of the Hologic breast tomosynthesis system in the world.

“As a mammographer, I’ve been waiting 30 years for something like tomosynthesis,” says Edward R. Lipsit, M.D., radiologist and president of WRA. “The conventional 2-dimensional mammogram is a good test, but it’s imperfect. The Hologic tomosynthesis system is more sensitive and more specific, and that is a tremendous advantage.”  

Firmly believing all patients will benefit from tomosynthesis, Lipsit and his colleagues offer all their patients the option of adding a 3D exam to their mammogram, charging a fee to cover costs for the 3D component. Almost 50 percent of WRA’s patients opt for the tomosynthesis option, but that number is rising as the word gets out about the advantages of 3D mammography.

“A key focus of our educational efforts is spent on educating referring physicians about tomosynthesis,” explains Patrick Waring, the WRA practice administrator. “The response has been really favorable; our referring physicians are impressed by the technology and tell us they will recommend 3D breast imaging to all their patients.”

Tomosynthesis is just the latest investment WRA has made in leading-edge imaging technology. The physicians at WRA were the first in the Washington metropolitan area to offer mammography services in the early 1960s, the first to introduce computer-aided detection for all mammograms, and the first to transition to full-field digital mammography.  

“We think breast tomosynthesis is the game-changer, the biggest in breast imaging in quite some time,” states Waring. “We are 100 percent committed to this technology and this investment.”

Case study supplied by Hologic Inc.

The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the physicians and staff of Washington Radiology Associates and are not necessarily those of Hologic. This information is intended for medical professionals in the U.S. and other markets and is not intended as a product solicitation or promotion where such activities are prohibited. Because Hologic materials are distributed through websites, eBroadcasts and tradeshows, it is not always possible to control where such materials appear. For specific information on what products are available for sale in a particular country, please contact your local Hologic representative or write to [email protected].
Hologic, Dimensions and Selenia are trademarks and/or registered trademarks of Hologic and/or its subsidiaries in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Related Content

Congress Directs FDA to Establish Federal Breast Density Inform Standard
News | Breast Density | February 19, 2019 | Jeff Zagoudis, Associate Editor
As part of a federal spending bill passed late Friday, Congress directed the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to...
Densitas Enters Partnership Agreement With TeleMammography Specialists
News | Breast Density | February 14, 2019
Breast imaging analytics company Densitas Inc. announced a new collaboration partnership with TeleMammography...
Hologic Launches Unifi Analytics Business Intelligence Tool
Technology | Analytics Software | February 12, 2019
Hologic Inc. announced the U.S. launch of Unifi Analytics, a business intelligence tool that allows healthcare...
Mount Sinai's Digital 3-D Mammography Van Rolls Into New York City
News | Mammography | February 11, 2019
Mount Sinai Hospital recently launched the Mount Sinai Mobile Mammography Program (MMP), bringing essential breast...
breast density cancer awareness
News | Breast Density | February 08, 2019
Governor Michelle Lujan Grisham has signed breast density inform bill, ...
An example of Philips' TrueVue technology, which offers photo-realistic rendering and the ability to change the location of the lighting source on 3-D ultrasound images. In this example of two Amplazer transcatheter septal occluder devices in the heart, the operator demonstrating the product was able to push the lighting source behind the devices into the other chamber of the heart. This illuminated a hole that was still present that the occluders did not seal.

An example of Philips' TrueVue technology, which offers photo-realistic rendering and the ability to change the location of the lighting source on 3-D ultrasound images. In this example of two Amplazer transcatheter septal occluder devices in the heart, the operator demonstrating the product was able to push the lighting source behind the devices into the other chamber of the heart. This illuminated a hole that was still present that the occluders did not seal. 

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | February 07, 2019 | Dave Fornell, Editor
Here is a list of six key trends in ul...
Siemens Healthineers Syngo.Breast Care Adding AI-Based Decision Support
News | Clinical Decision Support | February 05, 2019
Siemens Healthineers showcased the new planned artificial intelligence (AI)-based features with its mammography reading...
Podcast | Cybersecurity | February 04, 2019
Cyber hackers pose a worsening threat to radiology and the rest of medical imaging.
The top article from January was about researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) to image the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy’s hand down to a microscopic level. Non-destructive imaging of human and animal mummies with X-rays and CT has been a boon to the fields of archaeology and paleopathology. Most popular radiology articles and news in January 2019.

The top article from January was about researchers in Sweden using computed tomography (CT) to image the soft tissue of an ancient Egyptian mummy’s hand down to a microscopic level. Non-destructive imaging of human and animal mummies with X-rays and CT has been a boon to the fields of archaeology and paleopathology.

Feature | February 01, 2019 | A.J. Connell and Dave Fornell
February 1, 2019 — Here is the list of the most popular content on the Imaging Technology News (ITN) magazine website
 Volpara Solutions Launches Next-Generation VolparaDensity Software to Support SmartCurve Paddles
Technology | Breast Density | January 31, 2019
Volpara Solutions Inc. received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510(k) clearance for new technologies used in...