News | SPECT Imaging | September 23, 2015

Breakthrough SPECT Technology Wins Commercial Innovation of the Year at WMIC 2015

Show attendees award new imaging system with higher resolution, sensitivity than traditional SPECT

WMIS, WMIC 2015, MILabs, G-SPECT, Commerical Innovation of the Year, SPECT, PET, molecular imaging

G-SPECT photo courtesy of MILabs Inc.

September 23, 2015 — The World Molecular Imaging Society (WMIS) presented the first annual Commercial Innovation of the Year Award at the 2015 World Molecular Imaging Congress (WMIC) to Frederik Beekman, CEO/CSO, MILabs for his work developing G-SPECT.   

The award winner was chosen based on votes from WMIC attendees for the unique clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) platform that allows for < 3mm resolution, low-dose studies and imaging of fast tracer dynamics. Beekman and his team began work on G-SPECT in 2006, with hopes to translate their proprietary microSPECT technologies into a clinical machine. Given the current field-of-view available for this system and its unique potential for fast dynamic imaging, first applications are expected in brain, bone and pediatric imaging. A large field-of-view option for G-SPECT is already under development.

SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET) are two of the most important molecular imaging modalities in use for diagnosis and therapy follow-up. Today, SPECT imaging is applied to millions of patients each year. Although SPECT is a very useful tool, current resolution of typically 7-10 mm can limit diagnostic precision. MILabs has shown that this can be changed: The new G-SPECT has high sensitivity and far superior resolution compared to current clinical SPECT systems and has fast dynamic imaging capabilities.

WMIS asked members of the industry to submit abstracts for this award and six semi-finalists were chosen to present their innovation at WMIC. Semi-finalists were given three minutes to present, then the audience was given the opportunity to vote on the innovation of their choice. The six semi-finalists were selected from 28 submissions following a scientific review by unbiased reviewers. 

Two other innovations recognized as finalists for the 2015 Commercial Innovation of the Year Award:

  • Jeff Harford of LI-COR was selected as first runner-up for his abstract titled, "Targeted Photodestruction of Tumors Using Bioconjugates of Near-Infrared IRDye 700DX."
  • The second runner-up was Christian Wiest of iThera for his abstract titled, "The world's first tomographic hybrid OPtoacoustic/UltraSound imaging technology."

For more information: www.milabs.com

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