Blog | June 03, 2014

Surfing the Wave of Big Data

Big data was the hot topic of conversation at the recent 2014 Annual Meeting of the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) in Long Beach, Calif. Most discussions — both in the classrooms and on the exhibit hall floor — revolved around solving enterprise medical image management issues, adapting big data within healthcare practice and research, and understanding the current culture of healthcare enterprise IT. 

Image sharing has come a long way, however pros and cons still remain. One major challenge that still must be addressed is the sharing of documents; just because it’s on the Web doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s sharable, and vendor-neutral doesn’t mean patient-neutral. 

This year, SIIM helped lead the discussion and training to help solve  big data issues. A strong focus on healthcare enterprise image management was highlighted throughout this year’s annual meeting, which identified and addressed the questions and problems that the imaging informatics community must now consider.

The major takeaways from SIIM 2014 for most was “What is VNA doing for the market, and what is left to do?” and “What is the next informatics issue?” To get a clearer picture of what lies down the road ahead, itnTV interviewed several industry luminaries to get their view on the future of big data. You can check out all three videos here.

Big Data Trend

I met with Eliot Siegel, M.D., professor and vice chairman of radiology at the University of Maryland, School of Medicine, department of radiology, to talk about the big data trend, and what it means to personalized medicine as well as precision medicine, and also the challenges and opportunities that exist for radiology. Hear what he has to say in The Big Data Trend.

#SIIMHacks

Donald Dennison, SIIM Board of Directors and Hackathon organizer, met with me to discuss this inaugural event, its importance to the industry and future direction. Be sure to view the video, SIIM 2014 Hackathon, to learn more.

The Future of SIIM

Raym Geis, M.D., SIIM chair, spoke with itnTV about how SIIM is changing its focus away from radiology and more toward to informatics of all medical images. Now that every modality is starting to de-silio images, what are the next steps toward standardization? You can view the video, The Future of SIIM, from itnTV.

SIIM 2015 will be held May 28-30, 2015, at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center in Washington, D.C./National Harbor. For more information on the many new products and technologies showcased in the exhibit hall, visit ITN’s website.

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