Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director
Blog | Melinda Taschetta-Millane, Editorial Director | Artificial Intelligence| January 29, 2019

Takeaways From RSNA 2018

Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI

The Radiological Society of North America’s (RSNA) 2018 conference continued its theme of artificial intelligence (AI) for the second year in a row, partnered with enterprise imaging. Both were a recurring theme this year in sessions and throughout the expo floor. How machine learning will impact medical imaging was the key takeaway from the opening session, where examples of how AI will alter medical imaging in the near future were highlighted.

Artificial intelligence has been a growing topic in past years at RSNA, but this year several companies showed products that recently gained U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) market clearance. Many more were shown as works in progress (WIP) or are pending FDA review.

The show highlighted four main areas where AI is being implemented:

   1. Computer-aided diagnosis

   2. Clinical decision support

   3. Quantitative analysis tools

   4. Computer-aided detection

 

One of the trends seen on the floor was a movement toward AI app stores where these start-up companies can offer their wares through a larger vendor and provide a single point of contracts and IT integration for hospitals. In this issue, ITN has created its inaugural version of the artificial intelligence comparison chart. As this is our first go-round with this chart, we are open to your ideas and suggestions on how to improve on its content to better serve your needs. You can find the chart beginning on page 15 of this issue.

This issue also features extensive RSNA 2018 coverage from Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr, where he explains that efficiency will be key for AI’s future success. He stated, “While AI was the most obvious trend at RSNA 2018, its presence hinged on the need to improve efficiency. Enroute to that, radiologists need to be watchful.” You can read his article on page 19. Greg also filmed a new Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, which you can watch here: https://bit.ly/2FMgDvH

In addition, the ITN editorial team was busy shooting editorial videos throughout the show, with a particular focus on AI. Here are links to ITN’s coverage of AI at RSNA 2018:

VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial Intelligence, https://bit.ly/2A4jCf9

VIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Herehttps://bit.ly/2CAif8u

VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIhttps://bit.ly/2U4Gx1C

VIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-uphttps://bit.ly/2DoNmp8

 

ITN will continue to cover AI in future issues, keeping pace with its rapid growth.

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