A new study published by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that the common steroid betamethasone could be used to reduce unwanted side effects of radiation treatments for prostate cancer.

Getty Images


August 16, 2022 — A new study published by University of Kentucky Markey Cancer Center researchers suggests that the common steroid betamethasone could be used to reduce unwanted side effects of radiation treatments for prostate cancer.   

The research was published in the International Journal of Molecular Sciences June 8. 

The lab study led by Luksana Chaiswing, Ph.D., assistant professor in the UK College of Medicine’s Department of Toxicology and Cancer Biology, is the first to demonstrate that betamethasone protects normal prostate cells from injury induced by radiation therapy, while making the cancer cells more susceptible to the treatment. 

Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men in the U.S. While radiation therapy is important to control the growth of prostate cancer, it presents a significant risk of increasing unwanted side effects, including injury to normal tissues. 

“New therapies aimed at protecting against normal tissue injury while also increasing radiation therapy effectiveness are urgently needed,” Chaiswing said. “The development of such approaches would have a major impact on prostate cancer control and the quality of life of patients.” 

The team screened around 700 Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs for properties including protecting non-cancer cells against radiation therapy induced cytotoxicity, killing prostate cancer cells and increasing hydrogen peroxide levels in both cancer and non-cancer cells. 

Betamethasone, a corticosteroid that is approved for treatment of inflammation and cancer of the hematopoietic system, was one of the top five drugs with all of the desired properties. 

Betamethasone increases hydrogen peroxide levels, which activates a protective protein called “RelB” in normal, non-cancerous prostate cells. 

“The outcome of this project could lead to a new anticancer regimen that improves the efficacy of radiation therapy by sensitizing tumor tissue to radiation while simultaneously protecting normal tissue from radiation-induced side effects, which could lead to improved quality of life for cancer survivors,” Chaiswing said. 

For more information: https://www.uky.edu/ 


Related Content

News | ASTRO

October 6, 2022 ‑— Ahead of the 64th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), set for ...

Time October 06, 2022
arrow
News | Women's Health

October 4, 2022 — For Black women, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and as of 2019 has surpassed lung ...

Time October 04, 2022
arrow
Feature | Radiology Business

Here is a recap of what ITN viewers found most interesting during the month of September: 1. Lasting Lung Damage Seen in ...

Time October 03, 2022
arrow
News | ASTRO

The 64th Annual Meeting of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) will take place October 23-26, at the ...

Time September 29, 2022
arrow
Feature | Radiology Imaging

View the September/October digital edition of Imaging Technology News (ITN), including links to videos, comparison ...

Time September 29, 2022
arrow
News | Radiation Therapy

September 29, 2022 — Radformation Inc and Videra Surgical are pleased to announce a collaboration integrating Videra ...

Time September 29, 2022
arrow
News | PET Imaging

September 28, 2022 — Blue Earth Diagnostics, a Bracco company and recognized leader in the development and ...

Time September 28, 2022
arrow
News | PET-CT

September 28, 2022 — Xoran Technologies is engaged in a ground-breaking research project to develop a PET/CT scanner for ...

Time September 28, 2022
arrow
News | Radiation Oncology

September 26, 2022 — Cleveland Clinic received a $7.9 million five-year grant from the National Cancer Institute at the ...

Time September 26, 2022
arrow
News | Prostate Cancer

September 26, 2022 — Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s Game ...

Time September 26, 2022
arrow
Subscribe Now