News | Flat Panel Displays | May 24, 2017

Barco Presents Multimodality Imaging Display Solutions at SIIM 2017

Company will also highlight new breast imaging study and conduct a hands-on learning laboratory

Barco Presents Multimodality Imaging Display Solutions at SIIM 2017

May 24, 2017 — Barco announced that several of its diagnostic display systems will be on display at the 2017 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting, June 1-3 in Pittsburgh. Featured displays will include the Coronis Uniti, Nio High-Bright Color 5MP, Coronis Fusion 6MP and the Nio Color 2MP LED. The company will also highlight a new study on display luminance to improve breast imaging and host a hands-on learning laboratory session.

The Coronis Uniti display system offers a giant, 12-megapixel screen that enables radiologists to efficiently view all exams on a single display to make a better diagnosis. This also reduces the complexity and cost of the workstation footprint and eliminates the need for changing displays and/or reading images at separate locations. Capable of displaying picture archiving and communication system (PACS) and mammography images, the Coronis Uniti presents perfect color and grayscale, 2-D and 3-D, static and dynamic images, according to Barco. Additional proprietary intuitive workflow features help boost diagnostic accuracy and reduce occupational stress.

A new study led by Claudio Ferranti, M.D., of the Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Nazionale dei Tumori in Milan, Italy, recently confirmed that display luminance has a positive impact on the detectability of breast microcalcifications and spiculated lesions. The findings suggest a 10 percent or more increased detectability in digital breast tomosynthesis images (calibrated at 1,000 cd/m2 vs. 500-600 cd/m2). The study used digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) cases, some with spiculated lesions, some with clustered microcalcifications and some without lesions. The Coronis Uniti 12MP display with higher luminance improved correct detection with both increased sensitivity and increased specificity compared to the displays calibrated at lower luminance levels. 

The Nio High-Bright Color 5MP display system features 5.8 MP resolution (2100x2800), allowing clinicians to fit more of the breast image on the display to speed their workflow. Integrated smart features, like SpotView and DimView, allow radiologists to hone in on areas of interest to improve diagnostic accuracy while enhancing their reading efficiency.

The Coronis Fusion 6MP offers new features that increase radiologist productivity to help hospitals achieve higher return on investment (ROI) in their reading rooms. Increased luminance delivers 50 percent more light (600 cd/m2) to display 10 percent more JNDs and reveal clinical details more quickly for a more certain diagnosis.

Radiologists who work from home must be able to report and verify reports on PACS. For these cases, the Nio Color 2MP LED provides excellent image consistency due to superior color accuracy, brightness and contrast.

Finally, SIIM attendees can visit the Radiology Workspace Hands-On Learning Laboratory to provide feedback on how to improve the radiology reading workspace and reduce burnout. The model investigates how recent advances in software, monitors and ergonomics can improve comfort and productivity.

For more information: www.barco.com

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