News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | June 01, 2016

American Society of Echocardiography Hosting 27th Annual Scientific Sessions in Seattle

Highlights of 2016 meeting include live case demonstrations, new Echovation Challenge

ASE 2016, echocardiography, Seattle

June 1, 2016 — The American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) will host its 27th Annual Scientific Sessions, June 10-14, 2016, at the Washington State Convention Center in Seattle. The meeting will present educational sessions including cutting-edge research on the advances in cardiovascular ultrasound and clinical cases illustrating patient care. Two live case demonstrations focusing on the role of echocardiography in interventional procedures will be a highlight of the conference this year. Interventional cardiologists, surgeons, and cardiovascular imagers will perform valve replacement procedures, for attendees to watch, via a live satellite feed from the cath lab at the University of Washington Hospital in Seattle.

Richard Grimm, DO, FASE, from Cleveland Clinic, is the convention chair and has selected international cardiovascular experts to present to this audience of over 2,300 participants. ASE 2016 includes a variety of learning options such as hands-on sessions, how-to sessions, case-based presentations, information on new techniques, and intimate question-and-answer sessions. The sessions are designed to benefit all healthcare providers interested in the application of cardiovascular ultrasound imaging in the care of patients and in research.

The program provides participants first-hand access to the latest innovations, science, and best practices in cardiovascular ultrasound, as well as numerous opportunities to network with experts from all around the world. Attendance at this four-day conference can fulfill certification and accreditation requirements for echo-specific CME/MOC content.

New this year, ASE presents the Echovation Challenge, a competition to showcase novel approaches, technologies and processes that have the capacity to enhance the workflow efficiency of cardiovascular ultrasound laboratories while maintaining excellence in patient care. Three finalists have been chosen to present their transformative workflow approaches.

Susan E. Wiegers, M.D., FASE, ASE president, and senior associate dean of faculty affairs at Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Philadelphia, said, “While ASE has always been a great supporter of technological advances in cardiovascular ultrasound, we recognized the need to think bigger. The Echovation Challenge reflects the Society’s commitment to continually seek unique and innovative ways to drive change and improve patient care.” The finalists will present their innovations to a panel of judges and the audience who will then choose a winner.

Neil J. Weissman, M.D., FASE, director of cardiac ultrasound and ultrasound core laboratories at the Cardiovascular Research Institute at Washington Hospital Center, president of Medstar Health Research Institute and professor of medicine at Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, D.C,, and immediate past president of ASE, will present the 27th Annual Edler Lecture “The Future of Echocardiography: Disrupter or Disrupted?”. Theodore P. Abraham, MBBS, M.D., FASE, director, Johns Hopkins Echocardiography Programs, will deliver the 17th Annual Feigenbaum Lecture “Echo Muscles into the Mechanics Era – Strain Transforms Morphologists into Physiologists” during the Young Investigator’s Award competition.

ASE 2016 also boasts the largest echo-specific gathering in the world featuring over 60 exhibitors presenting new concepts, technology, devices and research. Participants can take part in interactive demonstrations to gain firsthand knowledge of how devices work and how they will benefit practices or institutions. Top experts in the field will make daily presentations in the Science & Technology Theater. Chalk Talk sessions with experts permit face-to-face interactions with faculty. More than 400 posters, including moderated sessions, featuring cutting-edge research on the latest advances in cardiovascular ultrasound or clinical cases illustrating evolutions in patient care will also be presented. 

For more information: www.asecho.org

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