News | Radiology Business | September 09, 2016

ACR-RBMA Practice Leaders Forum Offers Radiology Management Strategy Improvements

Attendees will learn how to fortify institutions for maximum effectiveness, value, patient satisfaction and profitability; gain insights on new healthcare payment models

ACR-RBMA Practice Leaders Forum 2017, Orlando, radiology business

September 9, 2016 — Radiologists and medical imaging business managers will gain practical management skills to align their business operations with new healthcare models at the American College of Radiology (ACR)-Radiology Business Management Association (RBMA) Practice Leaders Forum, Jan. 13-15, 2017 in Orlando, Fla.

Imaging practice and hospital executives — physician leaders, business managers and administrators — will gain insights on how to keep ahead of economic shifts, including the Medicare Access & CHIP Reauthorization Act (MACRA), the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) and Advanced Alternative Payment Models (APMs). Attendees will learn how to improve profitability and promote a value-based mindset within teams at this hands-on training course.

“This two-day meeting provides insights on how to drive value through innovation, teamwork and quality care,” said Frank J. Lexa, M.D., MBA, program co–chair and chief medical officer for the ACR Radiology Leadership Institute. The program “is designed to help leaders learn current business trends and get the most out of their practice in this rapidly changing healthcare environment,” he added.

“Working collaboratively, the ACR and RBMA offer radiologists and business managers critical examples of how to compete and succeed,” added Keith Chew, MHA, CMPE, FRBMA, program co-chair and past president of the RBMA.

Additionally, sessions will cover how to anticipate, adjust to and strategically position for new and emerging trends; explore practical strategies for maximizing reimbursements and patient engagement; examine news ways of implementing Imaging 3.0; and create an optimal care environment using cutting-edge information technology and service platforms.

Attendees may earn 13.5 CME, RLI, RBMA and Category A credits.

For more information: www.acr.org, www.rbma.org

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