News | December 16, 2014

Findings indicate that stronger signal is obtained when 3-D thresholded SPECT scan is performed rather than conventional SPECT scan; similar results may be obtained for other psychiatric disorders

Nuclear imaging, Clinical trial/study, ADHA, 3-D SPECT imaging

December 16, 2014 — A recently published study from Toronto, Canada found that patients who utilized 3-D SPECT were able to get a clearer diagnosis of ADHD, which is the most common psychiatric disorder in children and adults.

Published in the Journal of Neuropsychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences, the study used 3-D SPECT imaging, a nuclear medicine study that evaluates blood flow and activity levels in the brain. This research demonstrated that 3-D SPECT imaging is a beneficial tool for ruling in or out ADHD.

This study is important because of the way the SPECT scans were rendered. The 3-D renderings made the scans easier to read than the typical 2-D images, which required greater reading skills of the physicians. In the present study, 3-D thresholded SPECT scans gave a sensitivity of 83% in predicting which patients would have a clinical diagnosis of ADHD compared with a sensitivity of 10% for the conventional 2-D SPECT scans. A 10% sensitivity hardly makes SPECT scans useful for clinical psychiatric applications, which is why some researchers have criticized the use of traditional SPECT.

Daniel G. Amen, M.D., psychiatrist and founder of Amen Clinics, who is referenced in the published article but did not participate in this particular study, says, "This study points to a significant advancement in the care of people who suffer with ADHD and other psychiatric disorders. Until now, standard diagnoses in psychiatry are made primarily through talking to patients and looking at symptom clusters without any biological information. Psychiatry is the only medical specialty that virtually never looks at the organ it treats.”

For more information: www.neuro.psychiatryonline.org/doi/abs/10.1176/appi.neuropsych.12110280

 

Related Content

News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers

October 6, 2022 — IBA (Ion Beam Applications S.A., EURONEXT), a world leader in particle accelerator technology and the ...

Time October 06, 2022
arrow
News | Women's Health

October 4, 2022 — For Black women, breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and as of 2019 has surpassed lung ...

Time October 04, 2022
arrow
Feature | Radiology Business

Here is a recap of what ITN viewers found most interesting during the month of September: 1. Lasting Lung Damage Seen in ...

Time October 03, 2022
arrow
News | Radiopharmaceuticals and Tracers

September 22, 2022 — NorthStar Medical Radioisotopes, LLC, a global innovator in the development, production and ...

Time September 22, 2022
arrow
News | Women's Health

September 20, 2022 — Scientists from The Tisch Cancer Institute have uncovered a mechanism by which certain breast ...

Time September 20, 2022
arrow
News | Coronavirus (COVID-19)

September 20, 2022 — Children and adolescents who have either recovered from COVID-19 or have long COVID show persistent ...

Time September 20, 2022
arrow
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

September 15, 2022 — University of Minnesota Twin Cities scientists and engineers have found a way to improve the ...

Time September 15, 2022
arrow
News | Radiation Therapy

September 15, 2022 — The intestine is very susceptible and is affected by the harsh conditions caused by DNA-altering ...

Time September 15, 2022
arrow
Feature | Contrast Media | By Christine Book

The theme “Everyday progress” seems appropriate for the imaging community in 2022. What a year it’s been. Supply ...

Time September 14, 2022
arrow
News | SPECT-CT

September 7, 2022 — The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) and three partner societies have come together to ...

Time September 07, 2022
arrow
Subscribe Now