News | October 11, 2006

25 Percent of U.S. Doctors Use E-Records

Approximately 25 percent of U.S. doctors use electronic health records (EHR) to document basic patient information, while just 9 percent have advanced features for electronic prescriptions, patient notes and laboratory test results, according to a study by researchers at George Washington University and Massachusetts General Hospital.
The study also found that single or small physician group practices were less likely to use EHRs than those in larger healthcare environments. While the survey indicated that adoption of electronic records is slow, yet steady at three percent annually, at that rate, between 50 and 60 percent of healthcare providers will use EHRs by 2014.

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