Feature | Enterprise Imaging | November 24, 2018 | By Greg Freiherr

What You Need To Know About Enterprise Imaging

The first step toward setting up an enterprise imaging network should be understanding the needs of everyone who will use or capture a medical image. Only then, “can you make more informed decisions on the types of solutions you need and the type of technologies you need to look at to enable those solutions,” said Kim Garriott, on the third and final podcast PODCAST Hear and Now: What You Need to Know About Enterprise Imaging published by ITN in the run up to the RSNA meeting.

Garriott, the principal consultant for Healthcare Solutions at Logicalis, a global provider of IT solutions and managed services, recommends starting with IT for perspective on the technical considerations, then taking “a deep dive with clinicians from a variety of service areas.” After doing so, developers should “circle back to IT,” she said, to make sure they fully understand what needs to be done.

Although enterprise imaging may be classified as an IT project, clinicians must be very deeply involved, because they are working with the data in their clinical practice every day. Among the key considerations, according to Garriott, are how clinicians currently use medical images and how they capture those images, as well as how clinicians would like images displayed and transmitted in the future. The needs of patients also must be considered.

“This is about improving (clinicians’) ability to easily locate information in the electronic medical record. It is about being able to share information dynamically and securely with their colleagues, as well as with patients and have patients be able to share information back to their clinicians,” said Garriott, who chairs the Analytics Digital Imaging Model Global Development Team of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS).

Among the critical elements needed to set up a successful enterprise imaging network, determining how long clinicians must maintain access to images, she said, is a high priority. This determination may vary from one institution to another. It definitely varies among types of images. For example, maternal-fetal medicine may require images of the fetus only during the pregnancy. “But once the baby is born, it becomes dramatically less critical to have access immediately to those images,” she noted.

Understanding this varying need for access, Garriott said, “can determine when and how best to store images in that we are being cost-effective in our thinking about how we are going to manage that data.”

Help setting up a strategy and roadmap for establishing an enterprise imaging network is available from several sources. Some members of HIMSS and the Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine have been “living and breathing this stuff for six or seven years,” said Garriott, who co-founded and currently co-chairs the HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging Community. Consultants specializing in enterprise imaging comprise another source, as do vendors, who Garriott refers to as allies.

“It is important to develop relationships with the vendors and to learn from them,” she said. “Whether you decide to buy products from them or not, it is good to listen to several to really understand how they view the technology and see how things can be done differently.”

One trick to successfully setting up an enterprise imaging network is not to be overwhelmed by the magnitude of the task. The myriad considerations that go into such a network may seem insurmountable. That’s why it is important to look at the process as a multiyear journey.

“You don’t need to do everything at once,” she said.

 

Listen to the PODCAST Hear and Now: What You Need to Know About Enterprise Imaging

Listen to the first PODCAST PET Ready To Expand Into Sports Medicine And Beyond

Listen to the second PODCAST Hear and Now: Intervention Rising

For additional information, read the articles Interventional Radiology Profile Rises in Medicine and at RSNA Meeting and  PET Ready To Expand Into Sports Medicine And Beyond

Related Content

Guerbet announced the launch of OptiProtect 3S, a new range of technical services for its injection solutions. OptiProtect 3S is designed to support imaging centers in the daily use and protection of their injection solutions.
News | Contrast Media Injectors | February 25, 2021
February 25, 2021 — Guerbet announced the launch of ...
 Enterprise imaging systems provider Intelerad Medical Systems announced it has acquired Lumedx, a leading provider of healthcare analytics and cardiovascular information systems (CVIS). 
News | Enterprise Imaging | February 18, 2021
February 18, 2021 – Enterprise imaging systems provider Intelerad Medical Systems announced it has acquired...
GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

GE Healthcare introduced its artificial intelligence (AI) automation features on its Voluson Swift ultrasound platform at the 2020 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) virtual meeting. Features of this system include semi-automated contouring, auto identification of fetal anatomy and positioning on imaging. AI is seeing increasing integration in ultrasound systems from numerous vendors.

Feature | Ultrasound Imaging | February 18, 2021 | By Dave Fornell, Editor
Recent advances in ultrasound image sy...
Comparison of breast cancer mortality rates (red squares) and distant-stage breast cancer incidence rates from SEER9 (blue dots) and SEER18 (green dots) per 100,000 for white women aged, A, 20–39, B, 40–69, and, C, 70–79 years (3,7,8).

Comparison of breast cancer mortality rates (red squares) and distant-stage breast cancer incidence rates from SEER9 (blue dots) and SEER18 (green dots) per 100,000 for white women aged, A, 20–39, B, 40–69, and, C, 70–79 years (3,7,8). Image courtesy of Radiology 

News | Breast Imaging | February 10, 2021
February 10, 2021 — Breast cancer death rates have stopped declining for women in the U.S.

Images in 69-year-old man with biopsy-confirmed Gleason score 7 (3+4) prostate cancer. (a) Pretreatment axial T2-weighted fast spin-echo MRI scan (repetition time msec/echo time msec, 3820/97) shows tumor in midline anterior transition zone (arrow). (b) Intraoperative MRI scan shows contoured rectal wall (red line), prostate margin (blue outline), and region of interest (orange outline). Because the urethra was included in planned treatment volume, a suprapubic catheter was placed for continuous bladder drainage during treatment. (c) Intraoperative MRI scan shows focused ultrasound beam path (blue) overlaid on treatment plan. Rectangles illustrate each sonication spot. (d) Thermal map image obtained during treatment with heat deposition color coded in red overlaid on sonication spot. (e) Axial gadopentetate dimeglumine-enhanced MRI scan (230/2.97) obtained immediately after treatment shows devascularized ablated volume (arrows). (f) Corresponding T2-weighted fast spin-echo MRI scan (3820/97) at 5 months after ablation shows complete involution of transition zone. All seven cores from treatment area margins were negative for cancer at biopsy. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America

News | Prostate Cancer | February 05, 2021
February 5, 2021 — A technique that delivers...
Carestream continues global technology advancements in medical imaging with 70 patents over the past year
News | Digital Radiography (DR) | January 27, 2021
January 27, 2021 — Carestream Health earned 70 new patents in medical imaging in 2020 for advances in ...