Feature | April 10, 2014

The Role of Magnetic Nanoparticles in Breast Cancer Treatment

Dartmouth to share its plans for clinical tests in humans

Shown here at 9900x magnification, tumor cells readily take up magnetic nanoparticles (black objects). When a tumor containing nanoparticles is exposed to an alternating magnetic field, the nanoparticles will heat and kill the tumor cells.

April 10, 2014 — In a presentation exploring the promise of magnetic nanoparticle (mNP) hyperthermia in breast cancer treatment, Dartmouth researcher P. Jack Hoopes, DMV, Ph.D., co-director of Norris Cotton Cancer Center's Nanotechnology Working Group, reviewed preclinical studies conducted at Norris Cotton Cancer Center and discussed plans for early-phase clinical studies in humans at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR).

This evolving treatment approach involves the injection of nanoparticles into the tumor, which are then activated with magnetic energy. Once activated, the nanoparticles produce heat inside the cancer cell, the heat killing it with minimal damage to surrounding tissue.

Hoopes has led efforts in creating platforms, approaches and equipment to test mNP in the laboratory and in the exam room at the Dartmouth Center of Nanotechnology Excellence. He presented the enhanced uptake of breast cancer antibody tagged mNPs in xenograph breast tumors (human tumors grown in mice) following systemic delivery. The antibodies resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in tumor mNPs. The antibodies used were similar to the commercially available breast cancer antibody herceptin (trastuzumab). Researchers used only the cell-binding (fab) fragment of the antibody. This antibody-fab fragment was produced in the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth laboratory of protein engineers Tillman Gerngross and Karl Griswold.

“Although we initially used the mNP therapy in an intra-tumoral delivery manner, and it has been effective, our goal and much of our current research is systemic mNP administration aimed at invasive and metastatic cancer,” said Hoopes. “This is where the antibodies come in and the highly specific magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) -based nanoparticle imaging we are conducting at the Center for Magnetic Resonance Research, University of Minnesota with Professor Michael Garwood.”

Hoopes’ presentation reviewed biodistribution studies in mice, nanoparticle heating characterization in vitro and in vivo, efficacy studies in mouse tumor models and spontaneous canine oropharyngeal tumors, studies combining nanoparticle hyperthermia with ionizing radiation and chemotherapy and MRI-based nanoparticle imaging. He also addressed Dartmouth's preparation for clinical trials, including navigating the Institutional Review Board (IRB) and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the services provided by the FDA/NIH’s Nanoparticle Characterization Laboratory.

For more information: www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2014/04/140407090226.htm

Related Content

Videos | Mammography | December 10, 2018
Stamatia Destounis, M.D., FACR, associate professor, University of Rochester School of Medicine, and attending radiol
Youth Football Changes Nerve Fibers in Brain

Statistically significant clusters (red-colored) showing group differences (Control vs. Football) in white matter strain along the primary (F1) and secondary (F2) fibers. While body of corpus callosum (BBC) showed relative shrinkage in Football group, the other clusters showed relative stretching of fibers. PCR: Posterior Corona Radiata, PLIC: Posterior Limb of Internal Capsule, SCR: Superior Corona Radiata, SLF: Superior Longitudinal Fasciculus, SCC: Splenium of Corpus Callosum. Image courtesy of Kim et al.

News | Neuro Imaging | December 07, 2018
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans show repetitive blows to the head result in brain changes among youth football...
FDA Clears iCAD's ProFound AI for Digital Breast Tomosynthesis
Technology | Mammography | December 07, 2018
iCAD Inc. announced clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for their latest, deep-learning, cancer...
Fujifilm Collaborates With Lunit on AI Pilot Project
News | Artificial Intelligence | December 05, 2018
Fujifilm Medical Systems USA Inc. announced a joint collaboration with Korean-based medical artificial intelligence (AI...
ScreenPoint Medical and Volpara Partner to Bring AI to Breast Imaging Clinics
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | December 04, 2018
ScreenPoint Medical has signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Volpara Health Technologies. Volpara will...
GE Healthcare Introduces Invenia ABUS 2.0
Technology | Ultrasound Women's Health | December 03, 2018
GE Healthcare recently launched the Invenia automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) 2.0 system in the United States. This...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Radiation Oncology | November 30, 2018
Accuray's philosophy is to personalize treatments to exactly fit the patient.
Snoring Poses Greater Cardiac Risk to Women
News | Women's Health | November 29, 2018
Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and snoring may lead to earlier impairment of cardiac function in women than in men,...
ScreenPoint Medical Receives FDA Clearance for Transpara Mammography AI Solution
Technology | Computer-Aided Detection Software | November 28, 2018
November 28, 2018 — ScreenPoint Medical announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S.