News | December 19, 2007

Women’s Imaging Conference Tackles New Technology

December 20, 2007 – The University of Rochester, Department of Imaging Sciences, is presenting its second 2nd Annual Women’s Imaging Conference in San Antonio, TX, at the Westin La Cantera Resort, Feb. 3 to Feb. 6, 2008, focusing on digital mammography, breast MR, ultrasound and transitioning to a digital environment.
Also on the agenda is the discussion of advances in new technologies, including cone beam CT, tomosynthesis and MR screening for high-risk patients. Other areas of women’s imaging, such as cardiovascular, osteoporosis and thyroid will be included.
Lectures will focus on workflow and legal and economic issues resulting from transitioning to a filmless and paperless environment, including two sessions dedicated to digital mammography and breast MR for technologists.
Participants may schedule personal 30-minute sessions at any one of six different vendor’s multimodality breast imaging workstations where one can evaluate features such as: intuitiveness of the GUI, functionality of the worklist, workflow to view mammograms, hanging protocols, ability to process studies from various vendor’s mammography systems, number of clicks, integration with report and communication applications and ability to view modalities other than digital mammography, such as MR, US, PET/CT, nuclear medicine studies, projection radiograps and CT with 3D capabilities.
This year’s meeting has been designed to make it easy for attendees to have a side-by-side comparison of workstations from different vendors and determine which workstation outperforms another.
Also offered is three 50-minute US-guided breast biopsy workshops using exhibitor-provided equipment under the direction of Workshop Leaders including Margarity Zulley, MD, from the University of Pittsburgh’s Magee-Women’s Hospital, Phillip F. Murphy, MD, from the Elizabeth Wende Breast Clinic and Steven F. Harms, MD, FACR, from the Breast Center of Northwest Arkansas.
For more information: www.urmc.rochester.edu

Related Content

Philips Introduces Technology Maximizer Program for Imaging Equipment Upgrades
Technology | Imaging | January 17, 2018
January 17, 2018 — Philips recently announced the launch of Technology Maximizer, a cross-modality program designed t
New Vascular Ultrasound Registry Looks to Enhance Patient Care
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 17, 2018
The Society for Vascular Ultrasound (SVU), the Society for Vascular Surgery (SVS) and Medstreaming-M2S announced the...
Transpara Deep Learning Software Matches Experienced Radiologists in Mammogram Reading
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | January 12, 2018
Deep learning and artificial intelligence improves the efficiency and accuracy of reading mammograms, according to...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | January 11, 2018
Mindray recently featured a new upgrade for its premium Resona 7 ultrasound system at the Radiological Society of North...
Women Prefer Getting Mammograms Every Year
News | Mammography | January 09, 2018
Women prefer to get their mammograms every year, instead of every two years, according to a new study presented at the...
Planmed Clarity 2-D Digital Mammography System Receives FDA Approval
Technology | Mammography | January 08, 2018
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued an approval letter for the Planmed Clarity 2-D full-field digital...
Overweight Women May Need More Frequent Mammograms
News | Mammography | January 04, 2018
Women with higher body mass index (BMI) face an increased risk of not detecting their breast tumor until it has become...
New International Report Provides Comprehensive Guide to Imaging in Chagas Heart Disease
News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | January 03, 2018
Chagas disease (ChD), an infectious parasitic disease transmitted primarily by triatomine insects, has become a...
About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

About 25 percent of screening patients and 60 percent of diagnostic patients do not have prior mammograms available for comparison at the time of their examinations due to the lack of interoperability or other restrictions preventing clinicians from accessing prior exams.

Feature | Breast Imaging | January 02, 2018 | Kathryn Pearson Peyton, M.D.
Sixty million women undergo regular screening mammography in the United States, but even in the digital age, it is di
Overlay Init