Webinar | Medical 3-D Printing| August 09, 2017

WEBINAR: 3D Printing at Medtronic - Medical Applications and Outcomes

3D printing of the heart and coronary artery tree from a patient's CT scan.

Learn how 3-D printing empowers medical device manufacturer Medtronic to bring products to market faster, develop better therapies and engage in earlier clinical validation. With functionally accurate, 3-D printed prototypes, Medtronic can complete more design revisions in less time, empower physician feedback through an improved validation process, and gather clinically relevant feedback to accelerate time to market. In this webinar, see how Stratasys technologies enable Medtronic to save time and reduce cost, while also optimizing product performance.  

The webinar took place Sept. 14, but you can still access the archived version.

Register for this webinar

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