Technology | Advanced Visualization | June 30, 2016

Vital Introduces Vitrea 7 Advanced Visualization Platform

Latest release offers patient-centric, application-based solutions for 2-D, 3-D and 4-D medical imaging and workflows

Vital Images, Vitrea 7 advanced visualization software, SCCT 2016

June 30, 2016 — Vital Images Inc. recently launched version 7 of its Vitrea advanced visualization software. This application-based platform delivers full-powered solutions for 2-D, 3-D and 4-D medical imaging and comprehensive user workflows, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance (MR) and X-ray angiography (XA) applications.

Vitrea software is one of several solutions Vital featured at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) annual meeting, June 23-26 in Orlando, Fla.

With several new applications and unified, scalable deployment options, Vitrea software empowers chief medical informatics officers (CMIOs) and their clinicians to grow their applications based on current and future needs. The flexibility of partner applications being available on all deployments and content personalization built into Vitrea software can help CMIOs gain more rapid physician adoption.

Vital also streamlined the user interface and integration of new applications to ensure consistent user experience across all modalities (CT, MR, XA, positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography). By providing advanced clinical tools within a uniform user interface, Vitrea software enables physicians to have meaningful interactions wherever they are.

At SCCT, Vital showcased a Stratasys uPrint SE Plus 3-D Printer, which is able to physically replicate the anatomy using data from an imaging study. Vitrea software takes patient scans and converts them into STL files for direct use with a 3-D printer. A range of anatomical models from demonstration patient studies were on display as well. Many of these models were 3-D printed using Stratasys’ Connex line of 3-D printers that enables simultaneous multi-material, multi-color 3-D prints to mimic both the appearance and texture of patient anatomy.

For more information: www.vitalimages.com

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