News | Advanced Visualization | June 29, 2017

Vital Images Highlights Vitrea Advanced Visualization Version 7 at SCCT 2017

Latest version offers improved workflows across multiple modalities

Vital Images Highlights Vitrea Advanced Visualization Version 7 at SCCT 2017

June 29, 2017 — Vital Images is highlighting the benefits of its Vitrea solutions as it participates in the 12th Annual Scientific Meeting of the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT), July 6-9 in Washington, D.C. The company will focus on the advantages of its Vitrea Advanced Visualization Version 7.

Regarding workflow and user experience, Version 7 is easier to use and offers more comprehensive and consistent workflows for CT, magnetic resonance (MR), X-ray angiography (XA) and positron emission tomography/single photon emission computed tomography (PET/SPECT), and a more consistent interface across all Vitrea deployments.

Vital is also sponsoring a ‘read-with-the-experts’ session, offering an opportunity for attendees to be better acquainted with recent post-processing tools and techniques. The following three speakers will focus on ischemic heart disease:

  • Marcus Chen, M.D., of National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Md.;
  • Brian Ko, M.D., of Monash Health, Australia; and
  • Ravi Sharma, MD, of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston.

Vitrea software provides comprehensive multimodality applications in a variety of IT environments. Advanced imaging applications provide physicians with patient information anywhere, anytime. Radiologists can share images throughout their enterprise and collaborate in real-time with other physicians to help to achieve better patient outcomes.

For more information: www.vitalimages.com

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