News | April 10, 2008

Study Shows Minimally Invasive Surgery Reduces Nosocomial Infections

April 11, 2008 - Ethicon Endo-Surgery today revealed results from a new study showing laparoscopic surgery reduced the risk of nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections by 52 percent when compared to open surgery in a sample of more than 11,000 patients undergoing hysterectomy, cholecystectomy (gallbladder removal) and appendectomy.

Specific to individual surgeries, the study found laparoscopic surgery was associated with reduction of the risk of nosocomial infections during gallbladder removal by 66 percent, and during hysterectomy by 52 percent compared to open surgery. The study showed the reduction rates of nosocomial infections during laparoscopic appendectomy were not statistically significant.

The results of the study will be presented on April 12, 2008 at the Society of American Gastrointestinal and Endoscopic Surgeons (SAGES) Annual Meeting. The data also will be published in the April edition of Surgical Endoscopy, the official journal of SAGES.

The study, sponsored by Ethicon Endo-Surgery entitled "The Effects of Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy, Hysterectomy, and Appendectomy on Nosocomial Infection Risks," is said to be the first to examine infections specific to these procedures 30 days post-discharge, providing a more comprehensive picture of infection patterns than previously available. The study discovered 40 percent of the infections identified occurred within 30 days after hospital discharge.

Results of the study also showed laparoscopic surgeries were associated with a reduction in the overall odds ratio for each type of nosocomial infection. Compared to open surgery, patients in the study who underwent laparoscopic surgery experienced 80 percent reduction in the odds of respiratory tract infection, 69 percent reduction in bloodstream infection, 59 percent reduction in wound infection, 39 percent reduction in urinary tract infection and a 48 percent reduction in other types of nosocomial infections across hysterectomies, cholecystectomies and appendectomies.

In addition to the potential patient benefits due to reduced infection, there are cost implications of the study, as well. The study found that 27 percent of patients identified with a post-discharge infection were re-admitted to the hospital. However, there was a 65 percent reduction in hospital readmissions for hospital-acquired infections when a patient underwent laparoscopic gallbladder removal and hysterectomy when compared to open surgery.

For more information: www.ethiconendo.com

Overlay Init