News | Oncology Related Products | May 06, 2016

Study Finds Breast Cancer Adjuvant Therapy Benefits Vary Over Time

Therapies completed years ago may not keep covering survivors

breast cancer, adjuvant therapy, clinical study, University of Texas Health Science Center

May 6, 2016 — After breast cancer surgery, women are prescribed adjuvant (or follow-up) therapies such as chemotherapy and endocrine drugs to reduce the risk of the cancer returning. It's been assumed that the treatment effects of these therapies remain constant over time, but a new study from the Cancer Therapy & Research Center (CTRC) at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio suggests the opposite is true.

The study, published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, looked at 19 breast cancer adjuvant therapy clinical trials of the National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project (NSABP). Therapies were evaluated for relative benefit, defined as the percentage by which they reduced recurrence and death among study participants.

Researchers found time-varying treatment effects of adjuvant therapies in nearly half of the trials (nine of 19). "In some trials, the benefit diminished at specific points of time after surgery," said study senior author Ismail Jatoi, M.D., Ph.D., FACS. "In other trials, there was no benefit early on, but then there was a delayed benefit that emerged more than one year after surgery."

In one clinical trial, the researchers found that a regimen provided initial benefit, but then a subsequent disadvantage, to patients, he said. Jatoi is the Dale H. Dorn Chair in Surgery in the School of Medicine at the UT Health Science Center, and serves as professor and chief of the Division of Surgical Oncology and Endocrine Surgery.

The findings may change the way oncologists talk to their patients about effects of treatments they are receiving, Jatoi said.

"We are seeing more and more long-term survivors of breast cancer who had these treatments many years ago," he said. "The question is, if these treatment effects have waned, should we consider extended adjuvant treatment regimens for the long term in some patients."

Adjuvant therapy trials should be designed and interpreted with this in mind, he added.

In 2011, Jatoi wrote a viewpoint article published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology in which he proposed that treatment effects of adjuvant therapy regimens might vary over time. He approached the NSABP, one of the nation's largest clinical trials groups, about doing a study.

NSABP statisticians Hanna Bandos, Ph.D., and Jong Hyeon Jeong, Ph.D., conducted much of the work and are co-authors of the study.

For more information: www.jnci.oxfordjournals.org

Related Content

In a demonstration on the exhibit floor of the SBI symposium, Koios software identified suspicious lesions in ultrasound images

In a demonstration on the exhibit floor of the SBI symposium, Koios software identified suspicious lesions in ultrasound images. Photo by Greg Freiherr

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | April 19, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
Commercial efforts to develop...
Videos | Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019
In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, ...
Fatty tissue and breast density may be considered in the context of many factors that affect the occurrence and detection of breast cancer

Fatty tissue and breast density may be considered in the context of many factors that affect the occurrence and detection of breast cancer. Permission to publish provided by DenseBreast-info.org

Feature | Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
When planning a screening program to detect the early signs of breast cancer, age is a major consideration.
iCAD Appoints Stacey Stevens as President
News | Radiology Business | April 16, 2019
iCAD Inc. recently announced that Stacey Stevens has been named president. As president, Stevens will have expanded...
compressed breast during mammography.
360 Photos | 360 View Photos | April 16, 2019
A 360 view of a simulated breast compression for a...
A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images

A smart algorithm has been trained on a neural network to recognize the appearance of breast cancer in MR images. The algorithm, described at the SBI/ACR Breast Imaging Symposium, used “Deep Learning,“ a form of machine learning, which is a type of artificial intelligence. Graphic courtesy of Sarah Eskreis-Winkler, M.D.

Feature | Artificial Intelligence | April 12, 2019 | By Greg Freiherr
The use of smart algorithms has the potential to make healthcare more efficient.
This image depicts ABUS images with QVCAD results

This image depicts ABUS images with QVCAD results.

Feature | Breast Imaging | April 12, 2019
Imaging Technology News spoke with Bob Foley, vice president of sales and marketing of QView Medical, Inc.,
Uterine Fibroid Embolization Safer and as Effective as Surgical Treatment
News | Interventional Radiology | April 05, 2019
Uterine fibroid embolization (UFE) effectively treats uterine fibroids with fewer post-procedure complications compared...
iCAD Highlighting ProFound AI for Tomosynthesis at 2019 SBI Annual Symposium
News | Computer-Aided Detection Software | April 04, 2019
iCAD announced it will present its latest artificial intelligence (AI) software solution for digital breast...