News | Proton Therapy | July 17, 2017

Proton International and Beaumont Health Open Michigan's First Proton Therapy Facility

Two-story, $40 million facility employs IBA Proteus One technology

Proton International and Beaumont Health Open Michigan's First Proton Therapy Facility

July 17, 2017 — Proton International (PI) and Beaumont Health recently opened the state’s first proton therapy center, offering the most advanced form of radiation treatment available to people with a wide range of cancers.

“Our department, which has long been known for technical innovations in radiation oncology, today adds the latest in proton therapy to our arsenal,” said Craig Stevens, chair of radiation oncology at Beaumont Hospital. “It has been a pleasure working with all the teams in this project. Proton International provided the needed proton-specific expertise to building and operations to help us get off to a great start!”

Beaumont is one of the few but growing number of proton centers to open in the United States and the first for Michigan. The $40 million, 25,200-square-foot, two-story proton therapy building has a one-room proton treatment facility on the first floor and the Beaumont Children’s Pediatric Oncology and Hematology program on the second floor. Proton International participated in all phases of the development and opening of the center including the selection of equipment, the one-room Proteus One technology from IBA. The facility incorporates advanced technology from IBA including the S2C2 superconducting cyclotron.

Proton therapy is a precise alternative to X-ray radiation therapy for treating some cancer tumors. It spares healthy tissue adjacent to the tumor and reduces or eliminates many of the short- and long-term treatment side effects, making it particularly important when treating children whose smaller size makes them vulnerable to damage from X-rays. Proton therapy is especially effective in treating solid tumors including cancers of the brain, central nervous system, eye, gastrointestinal tract, head and neck, liver lung, prostate, spine and some breast tumors. Ongoing research is enhancing the application of the therapy to additional sites.

It is conservatively estimated that some 250,000 cancer patients in the U.S. alone could benefit from proton therapy, which is mainly being used to treat solid cancer tumors.

Proton International is currently participating in the development of the following facilities:

  • The University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Ala.;
  • Delray Medical Center, Delray Beach, Fla.;
  • University Medical Center Groningen, The Netherlands;
  • University Hospital and the Radiation Clinic Halle, Halle (Saale), Germany; and
  • The University College of London Hospital.

For more information: www.protonintl.com

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