Technology | February 15, 2010

Pocket-Sized Ultrasound Device Released for Point-of-Care Imaging

February 15, 2010 – A small pocket-sized ultrasound system was released today to provide physicians with imaging capabilities at the point-of-care.

GE Healthcare today announced the availability of its Vscan, which is roughly the size of a smart phone. It received FDA 510(k) clearance, CE mark in the European Union, and a medical device license from Health Canada.

"Having Vscan at my disposal at all times has allowed me to use ultrasound in a number of settings and with patients that I wouldn't have anticipated before – from the ICU, to the outpatient clinic as well as with ambulatory patients," said Anthony N. DeMaria, M.D., professor of medicine, Judith and Jack White chair in cardiology and director, Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine. "Vscan is more than a simple diagnostic tool. The hand-held device should help physicians make treatment decisions more quickly. I believe the Vscan technology will play an important role in physical exams."

The ability to take a quick look inside the body using Vscan may help clinicians detect disease earlier. This may prove invaluable in today’s busy practice environment including primary care physicians and those specializing in cardiology, critical and emergency care and women’s health, as well as hospitalists.

"During our initial evaluation of approximately 100 patients using Vscan, we have been impressed with its image quality and ease of use," said Jose L. Zamorano, M.D., FESC, director, Cardiovascular Institute, University Clinic San Carlos Madrid, Spain. "But even more important than that, we have experienced first hand the value of adding such a tool to our clinical and physical examination, adding clinically relevant information in roughly one out of every four patients."

Vscan offers the image quality that until recently was only available with a console ultrasound. Vscan leverages GE’s high-quality black and white image technology and color-coded blood flow imaging in a device that fits into a pocket and weighs less than one pound at 3 inches wide and 5.3 inches long. Other features include an online portal with training tools for the product and basic clinical applications; an intuitive user interface that can be controlled using the thumb; workflow enhancements; battery charger station and a battery life for one hour of scanning, voice annotation; USB docking station; link to a PC for organization and export of data; and Gateway software with services tools and remote diagnostics.

The Vscan is a prescription device for ultrasound imaging, measurement and analysis in the clinical applications of abdominal; cardiac (adult and pediatric); urological, fetal/OB; pediatric; and thoracic/pleural motion and fluid detection, as well as for patient examination in primary care and in special care areas.

For more information: www.gehealthcare.com

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