Technology | Ultrasound Imaging | February 07, 2019

Philips Launches Epiq Elite Ultrasound Series

Series includes Obstetrics & Gynecology model with lifelike 3-D scans, General Imaging model with vascular assessment solution

Epiq Elite for Obstetrics and Gynecology delivers high image quality and lifelike 3-D scans

The Epiq Elite for Obstetrics & Gynecology. Image courtesy of Philips Healthcare.

The Philips Ultimate Ultrasound Solution for Vascular Assessment combines 3-D and 4-D imaging

The Epiq Elite for General Imaging with the Ultimate Ultrasound Solution for Vascular Assessment

February 7, 2019 — Philips announced the launch of the Epiq Elite ultrasound system, a new premium ultrasound that combines the latest advances in transducer innovation and enhanced performance to improve clinical confidence and the patient experience. Epiq Elite offers a range of diagnostic ultrasound solutions tailored to the needs of specific medical specialties, including Philips’ first solution for vascular assessment and diagnosis. In addition, Epiq Elite for Obstetrics & Gynecology delivers high image quality and lifelike 3-D scans to provide advanced fetal assessment during all stages of pregnancy.

The Philips Ultimate Ultrasound Solution for Vascular Assessment combines 3-D and 4-D imaging, a simplified workflow and complimentary clinical tools to effectively assess and monitor vascular disease. The xMatrix transducer can produce high-quality 3-D vascular images, allowing clinicians to easily see directly into a vessel to evaluate plaque spatial location and composition, as well as view 3-D flow data to quickly assess stenotic conditions. In addition, the solution includes live ‘xPlane’ imaging – proprietary to Philips – allowing clinicians to acquire two planes simultaneously to improve accuracy of data collection, and reduce exam time by 20 percent. Icon-driven visual workflow makes 3-D imaging easier, reducing the steps that the clinician needs to take from 10 to one. Bringing 3-D and 4-D visualization to vascular ultrasound for the first time, this solution provides an ideal communication tool to facilitate clinical decisions and enhance patient consultation.

“Not much has changed in vascular ultrasound until this release of the ultimate ultrasound solution for vascular assessment,” said Muhammad Hasan, MBBCh, RPVI, RVT, RDCS, RDMS, manager, Departments of Echocardiography and Noninvasive Vascular Testing, Miami Cardiac & Vascular Institute, Baptist Hospital of Miami. “The combination of a new transducer and advances in software makes the assessment and diagnosis of vascular conditions through easy to interpret images. There is now a case to be made for ultrasound solutions to be used as a potential alternative to other imaging modalities in the current standard of care.”

The ergonomic, lightweight V9-2 transducer is the first high-frequency PureWave transducer focused on getting fine detailed images as early as possible to help clinicians easily perform confident assessments of fetal health. Paired with TrueVue, the Epiq Elite system allows clinicians to manipulate a virtual light source around the 3-D images of the fetus, producing lifelike images that provide a high level of detail to enable the identification of any abnormalities early on in pregnancy. The Philips aBiometry Assist application uses anatomical intelligence to automate time spent gathering measurements, reducing exam time to allow clinicians to spend more time with mothers-to-be.

“The high-resolution images I’m able to acquire using the V9-2 and eL18-4 PureWave transducers give me the ability to quickly evaluate a baby’s early development. With exceptional 2-D and 3-D resolution and excellent depth penetration, I can make more confident fetal health assessments during each trimester,” said Luis F. Goncalves, M.D., from Phoenix Children’s Hospital.

The Epiq Elite for Obstetrics & Gynecology will be showcased at the upcoming Society of Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) conference, Feb. 13-15 in Las vegas. The Epiq Elite for General Imaging, including the Ultimate Ultrasound Solution for Vascular Assessment, will be showcased at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR), Feb. 28 – March 3 in Vienna, Austria.

For more information: www.usa.philips.com/healthcare

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