News | March 05, 2015

Philips and UC Irvine Partner to Develop Standards for Breast Cancer Screening

Study will use Philips MicroDose SI to assess spectral imaging of breast density

Philips, California, UC Irvine, mammography, breast cancer, Microdose SI

March 5, 2015 — Royal Philips announced a collaboration with the University of California Irvine to explore how spectral breast imaging can improve breast density measurement, potentially aiding clinicians in more accurately gauging breast cancer risks and monitoring changes over time. The study will rely on Philips' MicroDose SI mammography spectral imaging technology.

Studies have shown that high breast density increases the risk of developing breast cancer. In fact, women with dense tissue in 75 percent or more of the breast have a risk of breast cancer four to six times as great as the risk among women with little or no dense tissue. Higher breast density may also make breast cancer more difficult to detect by mammography. The ability to more accurately measure breast density will enable radiologists to personalize breast cancer screenings and potentially be used for treatment monitoring.

With MicroDose SI, Philips introduced its first spectral imaging application with a feature called Spectral Breast Density Measurement. Rather than estimating density, the tool uses photon counting technology to simultaneously acquire spectral data of the adipose and fibroglandular tissue within a single exposure of a low dose mammogram. This provides an objective volumetric breast density measurement, paving the way for refined risk assessment and personalized care.

The first phase of the study will focus on assessing the accuracy of the spectral breast density application by analyzing 40 post-mortem breasts and comparing results with chemical analysis. The study is expected to be completed over a one- to two-year period.

"One of the biggest challenges for us has been the lack of quantitative standards, which makes it very difficult to prove the accuracy of breast density measurements," said Sabee Molloi, Ph.D., professor of radiological sciences at the University of California Irvine School of Medicine and the study's lead researcher. "Leveraging Philips' spectral imaging technology, this study will help us validate breast density measurements and set industry standards, which can help enhance the quality of diagnoses and treatment."

For more information: www.philips.com/healthcare

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