News | September 14, 2008

New Hypoxic Tumor Biomarker Deemed Safe

September 15, 2008 - Results from a safety study indicating that HX4, a new imaging biomarker that enables imaging hypoxic tumors, is safe for use in human positron emission tomography (PET) imaging studies, were presented on September 12, 2008, at the World Molecular Imaging Conference in Nice, France.

The biomarker was developed at Siemens Molecular Imaging Biomarker Research, and the study was executed in collaboration with Dr. Jian Q. (Michael) Yu and Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia. The study included initial human data regarding bio-distribution of the new agent, radiation dosimetry levels in normal volunteers and optimal patient imaging parameters with PET. Results of the study indicated that the compound was found to be stable for imaging at 145 minutes post injection, that it would safely clear the body through urinary elimination and that there were very low dose accumulations in major organs.

"Being able to image hypoxic tumors may significantly change the management of disease in cancer patients. The prognostic value of this level of information can effectively improve quality of life for oncology patients, offering them potential for personalized and possibly more effective treatment," said Hartmuth Kolb, vice president, Siemens Molecular Imaging Biomarker Research. "Siemens is committed to developing new methods to visualize disease processes with new imaging biomarkers in conjunction with our molecular imaging technology so that, ultimately, providers can detect and manage the treatment of disease much earlier."

Hypoxic cells are clinically problematic and tend to be less responsive to standard treatment regimens. A probe that measures hypoxia could prove quite a useful tool for oncologists. The development of an imaging biomarker that selectively identifies hypoxic tumor cells could help radiation oncologists tailor specific treatment options to most efficiently manage disease.

Siemens Molecular Imaging Biomarker Research facility in Los Angeles is dedicated solely to the discovery and development of new imaging biomarkers to spur the growth of in vivo molecular diagnostics. The facility houses scientists dedicated to the discovery of new imaging agents and their clinical development, with the goal of bringing several new agents to the market over the next five to 10 years. Research and development efforts conducted at the facility focus largely on oncology and neurology, and also include other areas, such as inflammation and microfluidics/nanotechnology research

This imaging biomarker is intended for exclusive worldwide distribution by PETNET Solutions, a fully owned Siemens subsidiary.

For more information: www.petnetsolutions.com and www.siemens.com/healthcare

Related Content

ISMRM Issues Guidelines for MRI Gadolinium Contrast Agents
News | Contrast Media | August 15, 2017
The International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine (ISMRM) has provided new guidance in the use of contrast...
Contrast Media from Bayer, trends in contrast media and developments in contrast media
Feature | Contrast Media | July 28, 2017 | By Dave Fornell
Here are several updates in medical imaging ...
Guerbet Announces Plans to Streamline Contrast Media Portfolio, gadolinium MRI contrast
News | Contrast Media | July 18, 2017
July 18, 2017 — Guerbet recently announced that it will phase out sales throughout the world of two products: Hexabri
ACR Offers Revised Contrast Media in Imaging Manual
News | Contrast Media | July 17, 2017
The American College of Radiology (ACR) recently revised its authoritative guide for the safe and effective use of...
FDA says gadolinium retention in the brain is not a safety issue
Feature | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 25, 2017
A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) review of the safety ramifications of gadolinium-based contrast agents for...
Targeted MRI Could Pinpoint Aggressive Prostate Cancers Before They Spread

The ZD2-Gd probe, represented by the orange ball and green arrow, binds to the EDB-FN in the prostate cancer cells with high metastatic potential. This results in a strong MRI signal (upper right). Prostate cancer cells with low metastatic potential have no EDB-FN and so there is no MRI signal (lower right). Credit: Han, et al., Bioconjug Chem-Apr-2017

News | Prostate Cancer | May 24, 2017
A research team funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) has engineered a...
Scientists Develop Novel Chemical Dye to Improve MRI Liver Cancer Imaging
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | May 03, 2017
May 3, 2017 — Scientists from the National University of Singapore (NUS) have developed a novel nanodiamond-based ...
Sponsored Content | Case Study | Contrast Media Injectors | April 13, 2017
The volume of computed tomography (CT) imaging exams continues to grow in the United States,[2] adding pressure to...
PRAC, European Medicines Agency, gadolinium-based contrast agents, safety recommendations, brain MRI
News | Contrast Media | March 13, 2017
The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency recently released new...
Overlay Init