February 10, 2011 – Pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that improved drug uptake in tumors can be visualized and measured in real time using image-guided drug delivery. The research, conducted jointly by Philips and the Eindhoven University of Technology (TU/e), Eindhoven, the Netherlands, shows that the measurements may give an indication of whether chemotherapy was sufficient, or whether more treatment is needed.

This proof of concept will appear in the Journal of Controlled Release in February.

Cancer chemotherapy treatment is used to kill tumor cells and is more effective at higher doses. However, the applicable dosage levels are limited by potentially severe adverse effects to the rest of the body. In pre-clinical studies using their local drug delivery proof-of-concept system designed for the treatment of certain types of tumors, researchers achieved an increased chemotherapy drug dose at the tumor site.

Some tumors contain sections poorly supplied with blood, meaning that chemotherapy drugs are not taken up evenly in the tumor. As a result, some regions receive sub-optimal doses and are therefore not effectively treated with chemotherapy. Methods for visualizing and measuring drug uptake in the tumor at time of delivery were demonstrated in the pre-clinical investigations. Such information may give an indication directly after the treatment if drug uptake was sufficient. Based on this additional information, tumors that did not receive a sufficient drug dose due to their morphology may be candidates to receive an alternative therapy.

The research was performed under the leadership of Holger Grüll, professor in the biomedical NMR research group at the Eindhoven University of Technology. He was also responsible for research into molecular imaging and therapy at Philips Research.

Grüll and his team used a combination of MRI and ultrasound technologies, along with tiny temperature-sensitive, drug-carrying particles (called liposomes) for local chemotherapy drug delivery. The liposomes, injected into the bloodstream, transport the drug around the body and to the tumor. The tumor is mildly heated using a focused ultrasound beam causing the liposomes in the tumor to release their drug payload.

Simultaneous MR imaging is used to locate the tumor, measure local tissue temperature and guide the ultrasound heating. In order to monitor the amount of drug released, the liposomes also contain a clinically used MRI contrast agent, which is co-released on heating. The release of the contrast agent can be monitored with MRI, allowing correlated measurements and visualizations of drug uptake in the tumor and surrounding tissue.

For more information: www.philips.com

Related Content

News | Digital Pathology

October 18, 2021 — Histolix, a leading developer of direct-to-digital read pathology solutions, announced it has ...

Time October 18, 2021
arrow
News | Women's Health

October 11, 2021 — Electrical engineering professor Magda El-Shenawee’s effort to develop a more accurate and less ...

Time October 11, 2021
arrow
News | Radiation Therapy

October 7, 2021 — ViewRay, Inc. announced that the company has received acceptance from the FDA on their recent ...

Time October 07, 2021
arrow
Feature | Cardiac Imaging

October 6, 2021 – A new study published in Radiology: Cardiothoracic Imaging on cardiac imaging trends over a decade ...

Time October 06, 2021
arrow
News | Ultrasound Imaging

October 5, 2021 — Ultrasound experts urged the health care community to work to expand utilization of ultrasound ...

Time October 05, 2021
arrow
News | Radiology Business

September 27, 2021 — Esaote, an Italian company leader in the biomedical equipment sector – ultrasound, MRI and software ...

Time September 27, 2021
arrow
News | Prostate Cancer

September 24, 2021 — Scientists have identified two subtypes of metastatic prostate cancer that respond differently to ...

Time September 24, 2021
arrow
News | Cardiac Imaging

September 22, 2021 — Test selection should be a shared decision between patient and physician rather than directed by ...

Time September 23, 2021
arrow
News | Women's Health

September 22, 2021 — Radiation therapy is an effective and widely used treatment for breast cancer. While the benefits ...

Time September 22, 2021
arrow
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

September 20, 2021 — Gadolinium-based contrast agents, the gold standard in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to ...

Time September 20, 2021
arrow
Subscribe Now