News | April 24, 2013

Mammogram Rate did not Decline After Controversial USPSTF Recommendations

Mammography rates actually increased at a slight but statistically non-significant rate

April 24, 2013 — More than three years after the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommended against routine mammogram screening for women between the ages of 40 and 49, a study from Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) finds that mammogram rates in the United States have not declined in that age group, or any other. The study results are published in the online journal Cancer.

"If the USPSTF recommendations had been widely adopted, we would have expected to see a significant decline in mammography rates among women in their forties," said the study's lead author, Lydia Pace, M.D., MPH, a global women's health fellow in the division of women's health at BWH. "However, this study demonstrates that younger women are continuing to get mammograms."

Researchers analyzed data from nearly 28,000 women who were asked about their mammography use during the 2005, 2008 and 2011 National Health Interview Survey. They found that among all women, mammography rates increased at a slight but statistically non-significant rate between 2008 and 2011 from 51.9 percent to 53.6 percent. Among women in the 40 to 49 age group, mammography rates also rose at a slight but statistically non-significant rate between 2008 and 2011 from 46.1 percent to 47.5 percent.

For more information: www.brighamandwomens.org

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