Technology | September 26, 2011

Infinitt Xelis Image Fusion Software Receives FDA Clearance

September 26, 2011 Infinitt North America said its Xelis Fusion software has received clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and is now widely available to the North American market.  

The software can be used as an integrated solution with the company’s web-based picture archiving and communication system (PACS) or as a stand-alone solution; this allows any third-party PACS user to query, view and analyze studies from any DICOM database to do fusion of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance (MR) images. 

According to the company, the system has been in use at 12 institutions across the United States and has demonstrated the ability to improve diagnosis and enhance productivity.

The Xelis Fusion:

- Supports fusion of PET, CT and MR data in any combination

- Offers automatic and manual registration methods, quantitative analysis tools and rapid image navigation

- Supports 3-D region of interest (ROI) analysis

- Provides presets and layouts for comparing two image sets

- Calculates PET Standard Uptake Values (SUV)

- Offers multiple standard and user-defined color maps

- Stores/sends the fused images in DICOM 3.0 format

- Includes integrated, freely rotating MPR functions

PET/CT fusion is used primarily to assist in more accurate and reliable diagnosis of cancer, and is covered by most private insurance companies and Medicare. Co-registration and alignment of different scans showing the same patient and pathology can add value to numerous image-based clinical review processes.

Medicare is continually adding to its list of approved clinical indications for PET and PET-CT. Currently Medicare reimburses for PET and PET-CT for:

- Single pulmonary nodules

- Non small cell lung cancer

- Colorectal cancer

- Melanoma

- Lymphoma

- Head and neck cancer (excluding CNS and thyroid cancers)

- Esophageal cancer

- Breast cancer

- Cervical cancer

For more information: www.infinittna.com


 

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