News | Breast Imaging | November 18, 2015

Gamma Medica Presents LumaGEM Molecular Breast Imaging System at RSNA 2015

Functional imaging system addresses shortcomings of mammography in early detection of breast cancer

Gamma Medica, LumaGEM MBI, RSNA 2015, molecular breast imaging

Image courtesy of Gamma Medica Inc.

November 18, 2015 — At this year's Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) annual meeting, Gamma Medica Inc. invites congress attendees to experience LumaGEM, the latest in molecular breast imaging (MBI). The LumaGEM MBI system features dual-head Digital Direct Conversion Gamma Imaging (DDCGI) technology that identifies tumors as small as 5 mm in dense breast tissue where mammography findings are inconclusive or even negative.

The growing awareness of the limitations of mammography screening for women with dense breast tissue and the necessity for an effective adjunct screening technology led to the creation of LumaGEM MBI. Unlike mammography, tomosynthesis, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), all of which are anatomical imaging tests, MBI is a functional imaging modality that highlights metabolic activity in the breast and detects tumors not visible on a mammogram due to tissue density.

A recent study conducted by Mayo Clinic, and published in two articles in the American Journal of Roentgenology (AJR) in 2015, determined that the addition of MBI to an annual mammogram screening demonstrated a near 400 percent increase in invasive breast cancer detection rates, 50 percent reduction in biopsies and a subsequent 15 percent lower cost per cancer detected than screening with mammography alone. With over 90 percent sensitivity and specificity, LumaGEM MBI has been shown to significantly improve cancer detection in women with dense breast tissue and complicated mammograms with fewer false positives relative to anatomical imaging technologies.

The LumaGEM MBI system is U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved and received its CE Mark allowing for the sale and distribution within the European Economic Area (EEA).

For more information: www.gammamedica.com

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Timothy Whelan is a professor of oncology at McMaster University and a radiation oncologist at the Juravinski Cancer Centre of Hamilton Health Sciences. He holds a Canada Research Chair in Breast Cancer Research. Photo courtesy McMaster University

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