News | Vendor Neutral Archive (VNA) | September 22, 2016

Fujifilm's Synapse VNA Now Serving Over 300 Oncology Sites Worldwide

Company will showcase latest version of vendor neutral archive technology at ASTRO 2016

Fujifilm, Synapse VNA, oncology facilities milestone, ASTRO 2016, radiation oncology

September 22, 2016 — The TeraMedica Division of Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A. Inc. recently announced a significant business milestone in serving cancer center customers. The company’s Synapse VNA (vendor neutral archive), an enterprise-wide medical information and image management solution, is now installed at more than 300 oncology facilities worldwide for the management of cancer treatment data.

The oncology facilities that use Synapse VNA technology interface with a total of over 800 linear accelerators. Synapse VNA manages all clinical oncology department data, both DICOM and non-DICOM, including radiology diagnostic images, radiation treatment plans and various other clinical data used in the treatment of cancer patients —  using what the company calls the most scalable single storage solution available. 

Oncology facilities rely on Synapse VNA for the ability to quickly access and share diagnosis and treatment plan information, as well as keep data secure, backed up and readily accessible for audit in a disaster recovery/business continuance environment.

Johns Hopkins — one of only 45 cancer centers in the United States designated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI) as a Comprehensive Cancer Center — implemented Synapse VNA seven years ago. Moffitt Cancer Center — ranked the No. 6 cancer center in the nation in U.S. News & World Report’s 2016 annual report of top cancer hospitals — is in the process of installation.

Fujifilm will showcase Synapse VNA at the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) 2016 Annual Meeting, to be held Sept. 25-28 in Boston.

For more information: www.fujifilmhealthcare.com

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