News | Artificial Intelligence | December 05, 2018

Fujifilm Collaborates With Lunit on AI Pilot Project

Collaboration will integrate Lunit Insight with Fujifilm’s REiLI AI platform across 94 clinics in Mexico

Fujifilm Collaborates With Lunit on AI Pilot Project

December 5, 2018 —  Fujifilm Medical Systems USA Inc. announced a joint collaboration with Korean-based medical artificial intelligence (AI) company Lunit Inc. and Salud Digna, one of the largest diagnostic service providers in Mexico with 94 clinics around 24 states. The goal of the collaboration is to have radiologists in a real-world setting evaluate AI technologies for diagnostic imaging being developed by both Fujifilm and Lunit.

Under the pilot project, Fujifilm's REiLI AI platform within Fujifilm's Synapse 5 PACS (picture archiving and communication system) will be integrated with Lunit Insight, Lunit's medical AI solution for chest radiography and mammography, at multiple Salud Digna facilities. The objective of the pilot project is to obtain feedback and input from approximately 20 radiologists at Salud Digna, with the long-term goal of advancing the development of AI applications and technologies of both Fujifilm and Lunit. The project also seeks to evaluate worklist prioritization features based on AI solution results that are in development within Synapse 5 PACS. These features are intended to improve radiologists' productivity as well as the speed and accuracy of diagnosis.

Under the REiLI brand, Fujifilm is developing AI technologies that support diagnostic imaging, medical workflow, and equipment warranty and service by leveraging deep learning with Fujifilm's image processing. In an increasingly complex healthcare environment with massive datasets and rising demand for high-quality care, AI technology has the potential to change the practice of medicine, according to the company.

For more information: www.fujimed.com

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