News | January 30, 2013

Europe-Wide Personalized Breast Cancer Screening Research Project to Use Volpara Objective Breast Density Measurement Software

ASSURE research project will use Volpara to help build a model of breast cancer risk and the risk of missing cancers

Matakina Internation Volpara Imaging Software RSNA 2012 Clinical Trial

January 30, 2013 — Matakina International announced that the Volpara objective breast density measurement software will be used in the European Union (EU) collaborative Adapting Breast Cancer Screening Strategy Using Personalised Risk Estimation (ASSURE) research project.

The company will showcase its role in the ASSURE research project as well as the use of Volpara in a number of large clinical trials and national breast cancer screening programs across Europe at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR) meeting, March 7-11, 2013. (ECR 2013 Booth: Expo E 560).

ASSURE project researchers have recognized that the one-size-fits all approach for breast cancer screening offers little benefit to some women, particularly those with dense breasts where mammograms often fail to show signs of early cancer. The ASSURE project will use a database of 80,000 screening mammograms and associated risk profiles to build a model of breast cancer risk and the risk of missing cancers. The aim is to develop technology to provide better screening options for intermediate and high risk women, such as adjunctive ultrasound or MRI imaging, based on personalized risk factors.

“In this model, breast density plays a key role, as one of the largest known risk factors and the factor making mammograms ineffective for some women. Automated, objective density assessment is critical for this project and Matakina researchers have a good track-record for developing these. I have already been using Volpara in a large, randomized screening trial because of its robust clinical record,” said Dr. Carla van Gils from University Medical Centre Utrecht, a partner in the project.

Members of ASSURE also include Michiel Kallenberg and Nico Karssemeijer of Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Nijmegen, The Netherlands, who presented a paper at RSNA 2012 about the association between automated, volumetric measures of breast density and diagnostic outcome of mammography screening examinations. They assessed exams from 33,029 women in the Dutch Breast Screening Program and found that the risk for breast cancer (before being adjusted for BMI) is up to 3.58 times in dense breasts compared to non-dense, or “fatty” breasts. “We are happy to use Volpara again to give us fast, reliable breast density measurements, and to work with Matakina in the project to further develop their technology,” said Prof Karssemeijer, who is coordinator of ASSURE Project.

ASSURE members:

  • Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre
  • Mevis Medical Solutions AG
  • Biomediq A/S
  • Mediri GmbH
  • Fraunhofer MEVIS
  • University of Manchester
  • University of Girona
  • University Medical Centre Utrecht
  • Jules Bordet Institute, Brussels

Volpara generates automatic, objective density measurements and is cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), HealthCanada, the TGA and is CE marked. It is in use at sites across the globe helping radiologists assess breast density more objectively and helping them better consider who might benefit from additional screening. “We are very pleased that the ASSURE researchers have selected to use Volpara, which measures breast density within seconds and will give the researchers objective, reproducible measurements for their modeling and we look forward to developing the technology to further help women across Europe,” said Ralph Highnam, Ph.D., Matakina CEO.

For more information: www.matakina.com

Related Content

MRI Reveals Striking Brain Differences in People with Genetic Autism

Example images for a control participant , a deletion carrier, and a duplication carrier. In the sagittal image of the deletion carrier, the thick corpus callosum, dens and craniocervical abnormality, and cerebellar ectopia are shown. For the duplication carrier, the sagittal image shows the thin corpus callosum and the axial image shows the increased ventricle size and decreased white matter volume. Image courtesy of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

News | Neuro Imaging | August 09, 2017
August 9, 2017 — In the first major study of its kind, researchers using magnetic...
Clinical Data Supports Use of Xoft System for Endometrial Cancer
News | Brachytherapy Systems | August 03, 2017
Researchers presented clinical data supporting use of the Xoft Axxent Electronic Brachytherapy (eBx) System for the...
brain with chronic traumatic injury
News | Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | August 02, 2017
Fighters are exposed to repeated mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), which has been associated with neurodegenerative...
The ASPIRE Cristalle FFDM system with DBT combines Fujifilm’s state-of-the-art hexagonal close pattern (HCP) detector design, advanced image processing and image acquisition workflow
News | Women's Health | August 01, 2017
Fujifilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. announced that The Mammography Center of Monterey, an ACR-accredited breast...
NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area

NIH-funded scientists have discovered that Parkinson’s disease increases the amount of “free” water in a particular brain area. Image courtesy of David Vaillancourt, Ph.D., University of Florida.

News | Neuro Imaging | July 31, 2017
Scientists at the University of Florida have discovered a new method of observing the brain changes caused by Parkinson...
more healthcare providers and patients are choosing options such as Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery
News | Radiation Therapy | July 31, 2017
Each year, up to 650,000 people who were previously diagnosed with various forms of cancer will develop brain...
Sponsored Content | Videos | Breast Imaging | July 28, 2017
Nancy Cappello, Ph.D., executive director and founder of Are You Dense Inc. and Are You Dense Advocacy, explains how
"Residual Echo" of Ancient Humans May Hold Clues to Mental Disorders

MRI data shows (left) areas of the skull preferentially affected by the amount of Neanderthal-derived DNA and (right) areas of the brain’s visual system in which Neanderthal gene variants influenced cortex folding (red) and gray matter volume (yellow). Image courtesy of Michael Gregory, M.D., NIMH Section on Integrative Neuroimaging

News | Neuro Imaging | July 26, 2017
Researchers from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) have produced the first direct evidence that parts of...
New York Hospital Finds Significant Cost Savings With Toshiba’s Aquilion One CT
News | Computed Tomography (CT) | July 25, 2017
In five years, Kaleida Health’s Stroke Care Center (SCC) at the Gates Vascular Institute in Buffalo, N.Y., has realized...
Overlay Init