Case Study | November 04, 2013 | Sponsored by EIZO Inc.

Elizabeth Wende Consistently Relies on EIZO for Its Critical Imaging Needs

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care in Rochester, N.Y.

RadiForce GX530 is Elizabeth Wende's monitor of choice.

Every EIZO diagnostic display comes bundled with RadiCS QC software in order for users to calibrate their monitor and stay within necessary medical standards.

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care in Rochester, N.Y., is internationally recognized as a leader in the field of breast imaging and breast cancer diagnosis. It is one of the largest freestanding breast imaging centers in the United States with American College of Radiology (ACR) accreditation and U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) certification. 

In line with Elizabeth Wende’s mission to provide the highest quality imaging and patient care, it chose to acquire and use the best imaging equipment available to make its critical processes as efficient and effective as possible. The facility has trusted in EIZO’s diagnostic displays since 2005 for all its digital mammography, 3-D tomosynthesis, and breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound needs.

“We use our monitors for tomosynthesis and have always gotten good reads,” said Diana Kissel, PACS administrator at Elizabeth Wende Breast Care. “Our original concern was whether the older displays we have had since 2005 would be able to respond well to our needs for quick refresh rates ... they did.”

The RadiForce GX530 that Elizabeth Wende most recently chose for its mammography needs is a high brightness 5 MP display with exceptional black points and outstanding contrast ratio to make diagnosis easier on the user. Its integrated front sensor allows for self-calibration, while a presence sensor can help reduce energy consumption by detecting when a user is in front of the monitor. It will enter power-save mode when no one is present, and then resumes normal operation once the user returns.

Every EIZO diagnostic display comes bundled with RadiCS QC software in order for users to calibrate their monitor and stay within necessary medical standards. “The quality assurance software is easy to use for testing the display, doing remote administration and generating reports for New York state, Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) and ACR compliance,”
said Kissel.

With the high number of patient reads that Elizabeth Wende handles, it also has a high need for ease of use and high quality imaging every day. The facility has found that EIZO monitors deliver an image that is easy to read, remains consistent over time, and gives them the confidence to diagnose and provide the quality patient care they strive for. “We’ve been using EIZO for quite some time. About a year ago, some of our monitors were reaching end of life so we did a vendor comparison for the doctors, just to see what else was out there. After a side-by-side comparison, EIZO came out on top,” stated Kissel.

Elizabeth Wende Breast Care also found EIZO’s service to be some of the finest they had received from any hardware company. “EIZO staff is easy to work with, and we always get a quick response and solution to our problems,” said Kissel. With the 24/7 technical support and five-year warranties on all medical displays, EIZO is confident that it can continue to provide the necessary support and product reliability that an environment like Elizabeth Wende demands.

With the advancements constantly being made at Elizabeth Wende and the patient volume at its facility, EIZO is proud to be a
part of Elizabeth Wende Breast Care’s workflow and is dedicated to providing it with the necessary tools that ultimately helps save lives.

Case study supplied by EIZO Inc.

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