Technology | July 27, 2011

D3 Oncology Launches Program to Accelerate SRS/SBRT Implementations

 SABRE_Website

July 27, 2011 — D3 Oncology Solutions will begin offering a comprehensive product to radiation oncologists and surgeons to rapidly and safely implement a successful stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiation therapy (SRS/SBRT) program.

The product is called SABRE, based on the more accurate description of SBRT as stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). The program brings together essential components of a successful implementation of radiosurgery, including clinical training for surgeons and radiation oncology teams; accurate small-field dosimetry; peer-to-peer consultations; go-live support; reimbursement guidance; follow-up reviews of quality assurance; and claims accuracy with one of the nation's most experienced clinical and technical teams.

Despite the published patient benefits of SRS and SBRT, many cancer programs across the United States have not yet implemented this service line, even though most modern linear accelerators have capabilities to deliver radiosurgery.

"Engagement of surgeons in SRS/SBRT delivery is critical to program success but availability of training and certification is often limited. Additionally, the targeted nature of SRS/SBRT can be daunting for many physicians, especially in light of recent high-profile errors that resulted in patient injuries," said Ron LaLonde, Ph.D, DABR, chief scientific officer for D3 Oncology Solutions.

D3 is collaborating with the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), UPMC Cancer Centers and Revenue Cycle Inc., to provide best practices and peer-to-peer support for cancer centers and surgeons.  

"Our success with SRS/SBRT at UPMC Cancer Centers has been centered around the close collaboration between surgeons and radiation oncologists in the patient identification and care delivery process, providing options to patients who were not otherwise candidates for other treatment strategies," added Dwight Heron, M.D., professor of radiation oncology at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and vice chairman of radiation oncology at UPCI.  "SABRE brings together the necessary knowledge and precise tools essential to replicate UPMC's SRS/SBRT success for cancer programs in other markets."

Finally, as part of a broader strategic collaboration, D3 has partnered with Revenue Cycle Inc., a radiation and medical oncology consultant, to bring programs for billing and coding training, claims accuracy review, verification of payment coverage and ongoing support for an extended period.  

For more information: www.d3onc.com

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