Technology | October 21, 2008

Contrast for Detecting Neuroendocrine Tumors on Display

GE Healthcare said the FDA approved AdreView (Iobenguane I 123 Injection), a molecular imaging agent for the detection of rare neuroendocrine tumors in children and adults.

Neuroblastoma is the most common extra-cranial solid tumor of young children up to 5 years of age, while pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor typically affecting adults. Both tumors usually arise from tissues of the sympathetic nervous system, most commonly in the adrenal glands. Neuroblastoma and pheochromocytoma can be difficult to detect at an early stage because symptoms may be non-specific when the tumors are small. AdreView images reflect the functional behavior of the tumor cells, thus allowing clearer characterization of even small tumors in comparison to similar appearing but non-malignant tissues, said GE. AdreView provides valuable adjunctive information to complement anatomic imaging procedures such as CT and MRI.

AdreView reportedly provides high-quality images that allow physicians to detect tumors, both at the time of initial diagnosis and at later examinations when relapse or recurrence is suspected.

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