News | July 29, 2011

Civco’s Protura 6-D Table Helps Boca Raton Hospital in Lung SBRT

July 29, 2011 – Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital has established itself as a premier Protura user. Medical Director Tim Williams, M.D., and his team have treated more than 100 patients using Protura, and the team is presenting a poster titled "Clinical Efficacy of Using KV -- CBCT Imaging Guided 6-D Robotic Couch in Lung SBRT [stereotactic body radiotherapy]" at the 2011 AAPM conference.

Williams has a high level of confidence in treating with Protura. "The Protura table allows correction in pitch, roll and yaw, adding a new level of precision in treatment setup for high-precision SBRT and SRS," said Williams. "At least 50 percent of our patients will have a correction in one of these dimensions, and in our program, having a full six degrees of alignment correction is essential for delivering these treatments safely and accurately."

Protura has provided the center with additional confidence and the ability to treat the most challenging cases.

"The Protura 6-D table has provided us with more accurate positioning during patients' setup, hence more confidence in the precision on delivered treatments," said Charles Shang, M.S., B.MED, D.ABR, director of medical physics, Lynn Cancer Institute at Boca Raton Regional Hospital. "We were particularly pleased with the fact that we were able to fine-tune 'roll, pitch and rotate' without reentering the room. For some challenging cases, such as intracranial and spinal SRS [steretactic radiosurgery] where rotations became particularly crucial, this system has demonstrated its unique advantages. We have analyzed more than 40 setups of lung SBRT, and found more than 57 percent of them need at least one-degree corrections in either pitch or roll rotation. Compared with manual setups, the 6-D automated robotic table increased our patient setup efficiency when non-translational correction is warranted."

CIVCO currently has 14 robotic systems installed in four countries, with several pending installation.

"As cancer centers continue to adopt more advanced imaging modalities, they gain the ability to visualize anatomy more precisely," said Eric Knipfer, CIVCO's director of business development for Protura. "By adding Protura, clinicians are able to take full advantage of the robotics platform by treating at sub-millimeter accuracy. We have seen the clinical advantages not just in SBRT cases but also in standard IMRT [intensity-modulated radiotherapy]. I am excited to see the increases in accuracy and efficiency along with the improved clinical workflow robotics adds to these programs."

For more information: www.CIVCO.com

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