News | Breast Imaging | January 23, 2019

Charlotte Radiology Chooses Sectra as Breast Imaging Vendor

Sectra PACS will allow multimodality breast imaging viewing across 15 North Carolina breast centers

Charlotte Radiology Chooses Sectra as Breast Imaging Vendor

January 23, 2019 – International medical imaging IT and cybersecurity company Sectra will install its enterprise breast imaging solution throughout the fifteen North Carolina-based breast centers of Charlotte Radiology. Upon project completion, radiologists will experience enhanced workflow productivity through multimodality viewing on one workstation with the end goal of improved cancer care.

“Even in an ever-evolving industry, our practice is thriving,” said Deborah Agisim, M.D., chief of mammography for Charlotte Radiology. “Specifically, our breast imaging program is viewed as a national leader in the field, optimizing new technologies while continuing to elevate patient care. We could not achieve these successes without key partners and tools that maximize our efficiencies like those offered by Sectra.”

Sectra PACS (picture archiving and communication system) displays ultrasound and magnetic resonance images (MRI) side-by-side with digital mammograms and digital breast tomosynthesis exams, facilitating comparison of current and prior images according to radiologist preference. Radiologists at all eight reading locations will have the ability to workload balance, ensuring timely and efficient reporting turnaround times for their mammography patients.

Charlotte Radiology, a founding partner of US Radiology, owns and operates 15 breast centers, a mobile breast center, two vein centers, two interventional radiology sites and jointly owns five free-standing imaging centers. Their 100+ subspecialized radiologists read more than 1 million studies annually for 14 hospitals, 30 imaging centers and a multitude of healthcare providers.

The breast imaging contract was signed in November. Sectra breast imaging is a component of Sectra’s scalable and modular enterprise imaging portfolio, which can be extended to other image-intense departments such as pathology, cardiology and orthopaedics.

Sectra’s solution for enterprise imaging, including breast imaging, will be showcased at the Healthcare and Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) annual meeting, Feb. 11-15 in Orlando, Fla., and at the European Congress of Radiology (ECR), Feb. 27-March 3 in Vienna.

For more information: www.sectra.com

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