Technology | November 05, 2012

Carestream Offers Native Lesion Management Module for Vue PACS

FDA clears lesion management tools to enable semi-automatic comparisons on Vue PACS Workstation

 Carestream Lesion Management

October 30, 2012 — Carestream received U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) clearance for its new lesion management module, which is a native oncology follow-up application that can be added for its Vue PACS picture archiving and communication system (PACS). Carestream will demonstrate its lesion management tools on a Vue PACS workstation at the upcoming Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) tradeshow. The lesion management module is now available for order.

Carestream’s new lesion management tools are designed to enhance assessment of oncology patients by providing semi-automatic tracking and segmentation of lesions from modalities and other vendors’ PACS systems. Each measurement generates an anatomical bookmark within the exam, which radiologists can easily navigate and diagnose.

Carestream’s new lesion management capabilities are designed to help enhance both diagnostic confidence and radiologist productivity. Making these tools available as an optional native PACS module helps eliminate the cost of dedicated workstations.

Carestream’s lesion management application also can equip radiologists with the ability to generate comprehensive oncology imaging reports in accordance with industry standards such as Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Consistent, standardized oncology image reporting allows for clearer and more meaningful communication and collaboration between radiologists, oncologists and referring physicians.

For more information: www.carestream.com

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